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Welcome to Phonics.net.au

This website offers a free, comprehensive and sequential phonic program for teaching children how to read. It is split into eight sections (including Phonic Packs) which are designed to be completed in order, however, each lesson is self contained and it's possible to pick and choose.

Each section is written so the lessons/activities can be stapled together to make a student booklet. Each section comes with detailed Tutor Notes.
To access each section click below.

You may also find the following posts useful in making the most of this Phonic program.


Why Teach Phonics?
What is in each Phonic Pack?
Lesson Schedules

You can also access types of lessons such as Single Sounds or Digraphs by scrolling down the menu on the left.

Continue reading to find out more about this program.



My name is Glenys Deutscher.

I am a school teacher with 37 years experience and over the years it has been my privilege to teach all Primary School Year Levels, from Kindergarten to Year 7.

I have been inspired to write these Phonic Books because I believe that systematic phonic instruction is the most successful way to teach children how to read and spell. Once children learn the sound for each letter of the alphabet, and can sound out three letter words, a whole new world of reading is opened up for them. Their confidence grows as they realise they can read and they soon learn to sound out longer words. The ability to read words fluently and with confidence improves reading comprehension. I have taught Year One children for many years and am convinced that a systematic phonic based programme enhances children’s reading progress. Each year I taught Year One, I had children who were non readers at the beginning of the year, progress to a reading age of over 8 years. Similar progress can also be tracked with Year 2 and Year 3 children whom I have taught with the phonic based programme. I have also used this programme to help older children who have been struggling with reading, with beneficial results.

I have written these Phonic Packs for parents (or other care givers) to work with a child because I am convinced there are many advantages for both child and parent to work through the programme together. Each year I have worked with many supportive parents whose positive input has improved their children’s learning.

Teachers and tutors will also find the lessons invaluable as they progressively and systematically work through a direct phonic programme. These lessons are sequential, so moving progressively through the phonic books could be your phonic programme (already written for you). However, each lesson stands alone, so if you do not want to move through the programme lesson by lesson you can choose which lessons are applicable to your classroom/teaching situation. Feel free to cut and paste.

Children not only need to learn how to read, they also need to be able to comprehend what they are reading. I have included a simple comprehension exercise at the end of each lesson to encourage the development of comprehension skills.

To be a fluent reader children also need to be able to confidently recognise common sight (look-say) words, so lessons introducing appropriate sight words are included in the Phonic Packs.

To help develop children's writing skills I have integrated simple punctuation exercises in to the Phonic Packs, and lessons encouraging the correct spelling of common words are included in Phonic Packs 5 and 6.

To encourage children to spell words correctly when they are writing, and to help children develop good dictionary skills, I have included a simple personal dictionary, which should be used when a child's writing skills develop to the stage where he/she is writing simple sentences.

To access the complete Phonic Packs click on the links in the menu to the left.

If you are searching for a specific type of activity (eg digraphs, reading sheets, initial sounds) scroll down the categories which can also be found (near the top) to the left. Some of the lessons in these categories are extension lessons which integrate reading with other learning areas and do not appear in the Phonic Packs eg Christmas, Easter, Writing Activities.

It is so important for children to be confident readers. It is my desire that this programme will help parents/teachers/tutors to empower children to achieve this goal.


If you have any questions please leave a comment on the questions page.


Happy reading,
Glenys Deutscher.

A number of people have enquired about ordering a hard copy of the phonic packs to save on printing costs and time.
To place an order:
1. Select your Phonic Pack
2. Click on the button below.


Select Your Phonic Pack:



NB: The following posts are the latest lessons/activities I have added to phonics.net.au. To access whole Phonic Packs click on the appropriate 'cover page' picture at the beginning of this site. For specific categories, click on the appropriate category/ies to the (top) left of this site.


silent 'c' phonics reading
Phonic Book 8 - Lesson 17 - Silent 'c' as in scissors and scene and muscle


Print the above image and use with Tutor Notes for Lesson 17 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

Lesson Seventeen: Silent ‘c’ as in scissors and scene and muscle

s__issors s__ience s__ent s__ene
s__eptre mus__le

1. Write the letter ‘c’ in the space in each of the above words.
2. Read the words aloud.
3. What do you notice about the letter ‘c’?
4. If you know the meaning of the word give it a tick.
5. Use a dictionary to look up the meaning of the other words.
6. Use a lead pencil for this activity.
• Study each word, one at a time.
• When you think you can write it without looking back write it on one of the lines below.
• Check back to see how you spelt the word correctly.
• Tick the word if you got it correct.
• If you did not get it correct, underline the letters that are tricking you then erase your incorrect attempt.

• Study the word again and write it again.
• Repeat the above steps until you have conquered the word. 




silent 'c' phonics lessons reading
Tutor Notes to Accompany Lesson 17 - Phonic Book 8


Print the above image and use with Lesson 17 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

Lesson Seventeen: silent ‘c’ as in scissors and scene and muscle:

Page 36 No 6: use a lead pencil and encourage children to write lightly so they can erase any mistakes.

Tutor Notes: Before working this exercise have a chat with the children about working honestly. If they look back and copy the word instead of testing their spelling, explain that they are only cheating themselves. It’s important for children to realise they are/can be responsible for their own learning. (Spelling the word incorrectly the first time is not the mistake – not learning how to spell it properly is the mistake.)

At this point it is also an appropriate time to have a discussion with the children aimed at getting them to realise that they all learn at different rates. Some children find spelling (or reading or maths etc) easy,
others find it difficult. Get each child to ask her/himself where she/he stands on the continuum. If he/she is one who finds it difficult then he/she will know more effort is required from him/her than, perhaps, from other children.
When children realise/come to terms with this their learning is less stressful, more enjoyable and they are more comfortable ‘in their own skin’. I have also found their learning improves.

This is a discussion that can be had many times throughout the year.
















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silent 'l' phonics lessons reading
Phonic Book Eight - Lesson 16 - page 1 of 2 - Silent 'l' as in palm and salmon


Print the above image and use with Lesson 16, page 2, and the Tutor Notes for Lesson 16 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

Lesson Sixteen: Silent ‘l’ as in palm and half and salmon

palm half salmon calm yolk
calf balm folk psalm balmy

1. Study the above silent l words for as long a time as your tutor gives you.
2. Divide into pairs and test each other on the spelling of the words.
----------------------------- ----------------------------- -----------------------------

3. The word palm has two meanings.
Write two sentences to show the two different meanings.
(Remember the correct punctuation for a sentence.)


silent 'l' phonics lessons reading
Phonic Book Eight - Lesson 16 - page 2 of 2 - Silent 'l' as in palm and salmon


Print the above image and use with Lesson 16, page 1, and the Tutor Notes for Lesson 16 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

4. The words yolk and yoke sound the same but have different spelling and
meanings.
Write a sentence using the word yolk.

Write a sentence using the word yoke.

5. Look at the following three words.
could would should
They are special words with a silent l.
They are common words that we use all the time so it is important to be able to read and write them with confidence.
Study the words. Write the four letters that appear in all words.

Cover the three words then write them from memory on the following lines.



tutor notes phonic lessons teaching
Tutor Notes, page 1, to Accompany Lesson 16 - page 1 of 5 - Phonic Book 8


Print the above image and use with Lesson 16 and other pages of Tutor Notes for Lesson 16 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

Lesson Sixteen: silent ‘l’ as in palm and half and salmon:

Page 34 No 1: explain to the children that they are going to spell the words to a partner.

Page 34 No 2: One child turns the sheet over while his/her partner calls the words one by one and checks
that the word is spelt correctly.

Page 34 No 3: Before the children write the sentences supervise a class discussion so the children
understand the two different meanings of the word palm.

Putting words into sentences:
• gives the child practise at using the words in writing.
We study words not only so the child can confidently read them but so he/she can also use them while speaking and writing.
• gives the child important practise at writing a sentence with the correct punctuation.
• gives the child practise at ordering her/his thoughts. This is a pre-requisite skill for successful writing.
Page 35 Nos 4 and 5: supervise as above.


Extension: Writing a Story:
Lesson One:
Each child will need a copy of a Treasure Chest and Narrative Framework (on the following pages).
Look at page 32 and suggest to the children that palm trees grow on tropical islands.
Discuss conditions on these islands – have pictures to show and discuss.
How would you get there?
Some of these islands are remote and can be used to hide treasure. Why would you want to hide treasure on a remote island?
Then it can be called a Treasure Island.
Ask the children to look at the silent l words on page 34.
Ask them to choose any of the words that could be used in a story about a ‘Treasure Island’ and write them in the treasure chest.
NB: To add interest and enjoyment to the activity ask the children to draw some treasure in the treasure chest and give the (half) page a suitable background.

story narrative writing
Tutor Notes, page 2, to Accompany Lesson 16 - page 2 of 5 - Phonic Book 8


Print the above image and use with Lesson 16 and other pages of Tutor Notes for Lesson 16 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

Lesson Two:
Each child uses the Narrative Framework to plan her/his story.
Each child fills out the framework for this story (using words and/or phrases)
Tutor Note: explain to the children that all successful stories have a beginning (introduces
characters and where the story is taking place), a middle (develop your story) and an end (how
does your story end).
Tutor Note: If this is the first time the child has used a framework some teacher modelling will
be required. Children need to be taught how to use a writing framework correctly.

( NB: Check: Phonic Packs 5, 6 or 7 for a Report Writing Framework
Phonic Pack 6 for a Narrative Framework)


Using a framework:
(1) encourages the child to think the story through before beginning to write.
(2) helps the child write the story in the correct order/sequence and so prevents ‘rambling’.
(3) encourages correct spelling in the story, as difficult to spell words can be corrected while
the story is still in the framework stage.
(4) allows the child time to think about and use correct punctuation.


Lesson Three:
Each child, using the framework as a guide, writes his/her story.

Tutor Note: this is not easy and may require some teacher modelling before the children attempt writing the story. The phrases in the framework have to be turned into sentences and some children find this challenging.
It is beneficial to take the time to train the children how to use the Frameworks correctly.
After the children have written a couple of stories using the Narrative Framework they will be able to write their stories with minimal help.

story narrative writing
Tutor Notes, page 3, to Accompany Lesson 16 - page 3 of 5 - Phonic Book 8


Print the above image and use with Lesson 16 and other pages of Tutor Notes for Lesson 16 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

Lesson Four:
Ask each child to think up a title for his/her story.

Optional Extras:
Draw/write the title on the front cover.
An Art Lesson could be used to create the cover. The children will need time to create special and exciting covers for their stories.

Lesson Five:
Divide class into groups. Each child reads his/her story to the children in the group.
I suggest no more than 4 to a group.

Each child could take the booklet home and read it to various family members.


Tutor Note: This is a beneficial exercise: (for example)
• It gives the child practise at reading aloud.
• Reading his/her work aloud often allows children to further edit the work.
• If children know from the beginning that they will be presenting their completed story to an audience they are encouraged to present their best effort.
• It consolidates the silent l words used in the story.
• It gives children pride in their work.
• It gives children practise at listening to other children’s work.
• It is beneficial for children to listen to and gain ideas from other children.
• It gives children practise at co-operating in a group situation.
• It is a beneficial way of ‘publishing’ the work.



narrative framework
Narrative Framework to use with Lesson 16 - Phonic Book 8


Print the above image and use with Lesson 16 and other pages of Tutor Notes for Lesson 16 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

story narrative writing
Tutor Notes to Accompany Lesson 16 in Phonic Book 8


Print the above image and use with Lesson 16 and other pages of Tutor Notes for Lesson 16 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions










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Lesson Fifteen - Phonic Pack 8 - Silent 'l' as in palm and half and salmon

silent l phonic lessons
Phonic Pack 8 - Lesson 15 - page 1 of 3 - Silent 'l' as in palm and half and salmon


Print the above image and use with Lesson pages 2 and 3 and the Tutor Notes for Lesson 15 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

Lesson Fifteen: Silent ‘l’ as in palm and half and salmon
Tick the box when you have completed each number.
1. Read the following words.
palm half salmon calm yolk
calf balm folk psalm balmy

2. What do you notice is the same in each word?
3. Pick up a red pencil and trace over this silent letter in each word.
4. One of the words has two silent letters in it.
Write that word on the line.
5. Discuss the meaning of each word with your tutor.
6. Look at the palm trees in the picture on the following page and notice that
each palm tree has three letters on its trunk.
7. Your task is to take each word from the group of silent l words (in number 1 above) and write it in a frond on the matching palm tree.

8. Fill in the bar graph on page 33.
9. Answer the questions on page 33.


silent l phonic lessons
Phonic Book Eight - Lesson 15 - page 2 of 3 - Silent 'l' as in palm and half and salmon


Print the above image and use with Lesson pages 1 and 3 and the Tutor Notes for Lesson 15 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

silent l phonic lessons
Phonic Book Eight - Lesson 15 - page 3 of 3 - silent 'l' as in palm and half and salmon


Print the above image and use with Lesson pages 1 and 2 and the Tutor Notes for Lesson 15 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

Silent ‘l’ as in palm and half and salmon
Use the silent l words on page 31 to fill in this graph.

alf
alm
olk

1. How many ‘alf’ words are in the graph?
2. How many ‘alm’ words are in the graph?
3. How many ‘olk’ words are in the graph?
4. Which sound has the most words?



teacher notes phonics
Phonic Book Eight - Lesson 15 - Notes for Tutor - Silent 'l' as in palm and half and salmon


Print the above image and use with Lesson pages 1, 2 and 3 - Lesson 15 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

Lesson Fifteen: silent ‘l’ as in palm and half and salmon
Page 31:
Ticking the box as each number is completed keeps the child on task.
No 4: the word is psalm (silent p and silent l)
No 5: knowing the meaning of a word gives the child more confidence to use it in future
when speaking and writing.

No 6 and 7: Make sure each child knows what to do to complete the task.
The children may not know what a ‘frond’ is.

Page 33:

Make sure each child knows what to do to complete this task.





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Western Australia Day


This activity :
• helps children understand why we celebrate Western Australia Day.
• integrates reading for a purpose with hand writing and writing.
• integrates into the Social Studies Learning Area
(History of WA, States and Capital Cities of Australia)
• encourages children to develop an interest in the history of their state.
• allows children to work at his/her own level of development
• encourages discussions about citizenship and how each one can
helpfully contribute to her/his community.


reading history western australia day
Western Australia Day - Reading Sheet One

Print the above image and use with the writing activity sheet.

Printing Instructions

Western Australia Day
Western Australia Day is celebrated on the 1st June every year.

In 1829, after a long sea voyage from England, the barque ‘Parmelia’, under the command of Captain James Stirling, reached the coast of Western Australia.

Captain James Stirling had sailed to Western Australia with a group of free settlers. The purpose of this voyage was to establish the first European settlement in this state. They had left England in February and arrived in May. The journey took 112 days.

At first Captain James Stirling ruled the settlement as Lieutenant Governor but in November, 1831, he was appointed as the first Governor of Western Australia.

June the 1st was chosen to celebrate Western Australia Day because it was on this date in 1829 that the settlers on board the ‘Parmelia’ had their first view of Western Australia.

Before European settlement Aboriginal people had lived in Western Australia for thousands of years.

Since 1829 people from all over the world have come and settled in Western Australia and now it’s a modern multicultural society.

Western Australia Day provides all Western Australians with the opportunity to reflect on our state, its history and its future. We can all consider ways that each one of us can contribute to make this state a great place to live and work.


reading history western australia day
Western Australia Day - Reading Sheet Two


Print the above image and use with the writing activity sheet.

Printing Instructions

Name:

Western Australia Day

On June 1st, 1829, Captain James Stirling arrived in Western Australia from

England.

He was on board the ship “Parmelia” with some settlers to form the first

European settlement in Western Australia.





writing history western australia day
Western Australia Day - Writing Activity Sheet One


Print the above image and use with the reading sheet.

Printing Instructions


writing history western australia day
Western Australia Day - Writing Activity Sheet Two


Print the above image and use with the reading sheet.

Printing Instructions



reading teaching
Tutor Notes for Western Australia Day


Print the above image.

Printing Instructions

Tutor Notes for Western Australia

This activity :
• helps children understand why we celebrate Western Australia Day.
• integrates reading for a purpose with hand writing and writing.
• integrates into the Social Studies Learning Area (history of WA, states,
capital cities of Australia)
• Encourages children to develop an interest in the history of their state.
• allows children to work at his/her own level of development
• encourages discussions about citizenship and how each one can
helpfully contribute to her/his community.

I have written two reading sheets.
Choose the one that is most suitable for the students in your class.

I have written two writing sheets.
Choose the one that is most suitable for the students in your class.
The second writing sheet is blank except for a map of WA.
This is to allow you and/or your students to discuss and decide what they will write.

NB: The completed sheets make an attractive classroom display.
They can also be read at your School Assembly.

Use the sheets as a springboard to discuss:
• the history of WA in more detail
• how the first European settlement coped with the harsh conditions in
WA
• how long the voyage from England took in those days
• the size and sea worthiness of the ships
• conditions on the ships
• why England was settling people in lands a long way from home
• why England was transporting convicts to Australia and other countries
• the impact this settlement had on the Aboriginal people
• when was the first Western Australia Day (Foundation Day it was called
then) celebrated
• why was the name changed from Foundation Day to Western Australia
Day
• I’m sure more points of interest will emerge as the discussions progress

NB: Details of this voyage, early European settlement and pictures of
Captain James Stirling can be found on the internet.
Do your homework before you introduce this lesson to your students.
The more informed you are the more fascinating and interesting you can
make the discussions.

After the reading of the sheet and the discussions that follow ask the children why they think WA is a good place to live. Then introduce the writing sheet and ask each child to write why she/he thinks WA is a good place to live. Each child can write at his/her own level of developmental.

Extension:
• why are there black swans on the reading sheet?
• label the other states of Australia
• label the capital city of each state
• have a map/globe of the world present so the children can find Australia
on it
• have a map/globe of the world present so the children can find England
on it
• trace the voyage from England to Australia on a map/globe of the world
• expand your discussions into projects about WA.
eg - Small groups could research wheat, wool, gold, iron ore, Argyle diamonds, pearling, fishing, early European settlements, Aboriginal studies, WA’s wildflowers, fauna (etc)

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Mother's Day Activity

April 20th 2015 06:25
The following activity integrates reading for a purpose, comprehension, art and craft, following instructions, development of fine motor skills, hand writing and writing (messages), studying special days and looking at different family structures.

Each child reads and follows instructions, as per lesson task sheets, to make a card to give to a special person on Mother’s Day and writes a short message to the person for whom the card had been made.


Mother's Day reading art craft
A Special Greeting Card for Mother's Day - Student Activity Sheet 1 of 5


Print the above image and use with Student Activity Sheets 2-5, and Tutor Notes.

Printing Instructions

A Special Greeting Card page 1

NAME:

Today you are going to make a special greeting card. A card for someone special !
This will be fun.

Hint: To make a beautiful card you will need to work carefully.
You will need to colour in carefully, cut out exactly on the lines,
and fold exactly on the dotted line.

1. Before you start your card collect the following materials:

1 Special Greeting Card outline sheets
1 pair of scissors
1 set of sharpened coloured pencils
1 sharpened lead pencil
1 set of felt pens
1 eraser
1 paper fastener
1 glue stick

When you have collected all the materials you need to make your Special Greeting Card, tick the box and go to Number 2.


2. Look at the Special Greeting Card Outline Sheet:

• Notice the two heart shapes and how they are joined together with a short dotted line.
This dotted line is a folding line (do not cut it).
The two heart shapes will fold together to make your card.

• Look at the three flowers across the bottom of the sheet.
Notice they are the same shape as the flower on the front of your card.
Notice that they are different sizes.
Later you will colour these flowers, cut them out,
place them over the flower on the front of your card
and secure them there with the paper fastener.

When you colour these flowers it will be important to choose colours that look good together.

When you are sure you have taken good notice of these things, tick the box and go to Number 3.

3. There are two lines on the front of your card.

Your teacher will explain to you what you have to write on these lines.

When you have followed your teacher’s instructions and you have written on the lines
tick the box and go to Number 4.


Mother's Day reading art craft
A Special Greeting Card for Mother's Day - Student Activity Sheet 2 of 5


Print the above image and use with Student Activity Sheets 1,3,4 5, and Tutor Notes.

Printing Instructions

4. page 2
Hello. I’m Daisy.

I’m the special flower on the back of
your Special Greeting Card.

Can you find me there?

Before you colour me in you need to decide what
colours you are going to use.

Are you going to use one colour or are you going
to make a pattern using more than one colour?

Tracing over my black lines with a felt pen
and then colouring in my petals, leaves and centre
makes me look very glamorous.



Choose the colours you are going to use
and colour in this flower on your card.

When you have coloured in the flower tick the box.

Check point. Look at your flower. Is this your best colouring in?
When you can answer YES tick the box and go to Number 5.

5. Look at the four other flowers on your sheet.

One flower is on the front of your card and the other three are along the bottom
of your sheet.

These four flowers are going to be placed one on top of the other to make one
beautiful flower on the front of your card.

Choose the colours you are going to use to colour in the flowers.
Are you going to use one colour or are you going to make a pattern using more than one colour?

When you have decided the colours you are going to use colour in all the flowers.

Remember: Tracing over black lines with a felt pen
and then colouring with the same coloured pencil
makes the petals look amazing.

When you have coloured in all four flowers tick the box.

Check point. Look at the four flowers. Is this your best colouring in?
When you can answer YES tick the box and go to Number 6.


Mother's Day reading art craft
A Special Greeting Card for Mother's Day - Student Activity Sheet 3 of 5


Print the above image and use with Student Activity Sheets 1,2,4 5, and Tutor Notes.

Printing Instructions

page 3
6. Take your scissors and:

• very carefully cut out the three flowers at the bottom of your sheet.

• very carefully cut out your heart shaped card.

Remember: do not cut on the dotted line.

To make this card the best it can be
remember to cut out carefully.

When you have cut out the three flowers from the bottom of your sheet and you have cut out
your heart shaped card tick the box and go to Number 7.

7.
• Take the three flowers from the bottom of your sheet and place them over the flower on the front of your card.

• Place them in order of size.
The smallest flower should be on top of the other flowers.

• Turn the petals of each flower and arrange them so they make
one beautiful flower on the front of your card.

• Push the paper fastener through the centre of each flower and secure the petals to make one beautiful flower.

Paper fasteners can have sharp points

so be careful not to prick your fingers.

When you have created the flower on the front of your card tick the box and go to Number 8




Mother's Day hearts reading
A Special Greeting Card for Mother's Day - Student Activity Sheet 4 of 5


Print the above image and use with Student Activity Sheets 1,2,3 5, and Tutor Notes.

Printing Instructions

8. page 4

The two hearts on this page
are for you to use
to write a message
to the special person
for whom
you have made the card.

You may choose
to use one heart
or you may choose
to use them both.

The hearts go inside the card.


• Write a message on this heart,
cut it out and glue it
onto the inside of the back
of your card.

• Write a message on
this heart,
cut it out and
push the paper fastener
through the oval shape
to attach it to the inside
of the front of your card.

When you have written your message and
attached it to your card tick the box

CONGRATULATIONS !!
You have completed your special card.

Mother's Day reading art craft
A Special Greeting Card for Mother's Day - Student Activity Sheet 5 of 5


Print the above image and use with Student Activity Sheets 1,2,3 4, and Tutor Notes.

Printing Instructions




Tutor Notes Mother's Day hearts
Tutor Notes for A Special Greeting Card for Mother's Day


Print the above image and use with Student Activity Sheets 1,2,3,4 5.

Printing Instructions

A Card for Mother’s Day

Notes for Tutor:

The following activity integrates reading for a purpose, comprehension, art and craft, following instructions, development of fine motor skills, hand writing and writing (messages), studying special days, looking at different family structures.

Each child reads and follows instructions, as per lesson task sheets, to make a card to give to a special person on Mother’s Day and writes a short message to the person for whom the card had been made.

Please Note: This is a card for Mother’s Day but I have purposefully not mentioned making the card for ‘Mother’ because some children may not live with their Mother. For instance, if the child is living with her/his grandparents she/he may wish to make the card for Grandma or a child may call his/her prime female carer by her first name. A sensitive class discussion before this activity will enable each child to decide for whom he/she will make the card.

Therefore:
Note step Number 3 on page1 of the student task sheets.
On these two lines each child will write eg To Mum or To Mother or To Grandma or To Linda

Materials needed for each child for this activity:

1 Special Greeting Card outline sheet
1 pair of scissors
1 set of sharpened coloured pencils
1 sharpened lead pencil
1 set of felt pens
1 eraser
1 paper fastener
1 glue stick

Note:
You may choose to copy the Mother’s Day card onto light coloured (rather than white) paper.
You may choose to copy the Mother’s Day card onto thin card rather than 80GSM paper.

I have encouraged the children to outline the flowers on the card with felt pens and then colour them in with coloured pencils. This creates a good effect.
I do not encourage children to colour in with felt pens.

Lessons:
• The amount of help required by the children in your class will be determined by their maturity/development. If you attempt this activity with a Year One or Two class, for instance, you may decide to keep the class together, reading each step together and working each step together.
If you are using this activity with a Year Three class, some of the children may be able to work independently, requiring minimal help and working as a ‘read and do’ activity.

• Depending on the maturity/development of the children in your class you may choose to make this card in three lessons:
Eg Lesson One: Numbers 1 to 4.
Lesson Two: Numbers 5 to 7
Lesson Three: Number 8
Writing the message could be part of your Writing programme.
Children will benefit from discussions and the charting of appropriate words
to help motivate work she/he can be proud of.
Plan ahead so the children have enough time to complete this task satisfactorily.
Record keeping: Observing the children during this activity could help you with your records.

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Naplan Tests - Year Three

April 13th 2015 05:40
Year 3 – a Naplan Year

If you are teaching Year Three students you may find the lessons under the category Naplan Test Lessons helpful.

I wrote the lessons for a Year Three student (WA) who was preparing for the Naplan Test because he wasn’t confident with these topics.
I am including them in my blog because they may be helpful for other students at this stage of development.


It is good to isolate teaching points so the children can study and gain a good understanding of them, and then confidently integrate them back into their written work.
(This is called ‘intentional teaching’)


Lessons which introduce and develop an understanding of contractions, the possessive apostrophe, capital letters, nouns and proper nouns can be found under this category.
Just look down the list of categories to left of the top blog and click on
Naplan Test Lessons.



Note:
You will need to browse all the lessons in this category to discover all the lessons for each heading.



Enjoy


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An Easter Message in an Easter Box

March 4th 2015 11:15
An Easter Message in an Easter Box

The reading activity I have prepared for you this year integrates reading for a purpose, comprehension, extending reading vocabulary, following instructions, problem solving, art and craft, fine motor skills, maths, spelling, hand writing and writing (messages) and being encouraged to produce work of a personal best standard.

Reading, understanding and following written instructions is an important comprehension skill for children to master.
Putting in the effort to produce a carefully crafted Easter Box develops pride in one’s work. Children realise that good results are often the product of effort.
The children follow instructions as per the student work sheets to make an Easter Box to give to a relative or friend. A short message and/or gift is put inside the box.



To access other exciting Easter activities go to the categories to the left of the top blog and click on the category -- 'Easter' --.

The activities you will find as you scroll down in this folder are:
1. Easter in the Classroom
2. Easter Basket and Easter Eggs (cooking)
3. Easter Riddles
4. Rabbit Mask
5. Making smaller wards from the word "Easter"
6. An Easter Book for emerging readers.
7. What is inside this Easter Egg?
8. Easter Messages in an Easter Egg.


Easter art craft activity reading lesson school
Easter Message in an Easter Box - Student Task Sheet 1 of 4


Print the above image and use with Student Task Sheets 2, 3 and 4, the Easter Box Outline Sheet, the sheet of Easter pictures and the Tutor Notes pages 1 and 2.

Printing Instructions

Easter Box page 1

NAME:

Today you are going to make an Easter Box to give to a relative or friend.

Hint: The more careful you are as you make your Easter Box the better it will look when you have completed it.
You will need to colour in carefully, cut out exactly on the lines, fold exactly on the dashes and glue accurately.
Then you will have a super Easter Box.


1. Collect the following materials for your Easter Box.
1 Easter Box outline sheet
1 sheet of Easter pictures
1 pair of scissors
1 box of sharpened coloured pencils
1 sharpened lead pencil
1 eraser
1 glue stick (you may need to share)

Note: Your teacher will supply you with the materials you will need for the message or gift you will put into your box.

When you have collected all the materials you need to make your Easter Box, tick the box and go to Number 2.

2. Look at the Easter Box outline and take notice of:
• The solid black lines that make up the outline shape of the box.
These are cutting lines.
• The lines of dashes on the box.
These are folding lines.
• The tabs that have the word ‘Glue __ ‘ on them.
You will glue them in the order they are numbered.
• The tabs that have crosses on them.
These tabs belong to the lid of your box.
They are the last tabs you will glue to complete your box.

When you are sure you have taken good notice of these things, tick the box and go to Number 3.

Easter art craft activity reading lesson school
Easter Message in an Easter Box - Student Task Sheet 2 of 4


Print the above image and use with Student Task Sheets 1, 3 and 4, the Easter Box Outline Sheet, the sheet of Easter pictures and the Tutor Notes pages 1 and 2.

Printing Instructions

3. (a) Look at the sheet of Easter pictures. page 2

You need to choose the 4 pictures you would like to have on your Easter Box.

There are some blank squares on this sheet. If you would like to you can draw and use your own Easter pictures in these squares.

(b) Colour, or draw and colour, the pictures you have chosen.

When you have coloured in the 4 pictures you have chosen tick the box.


Check point. Look at your pictures. Is this your best colouring in?
When you can answer YES tick the box and go to Number 4.

4. Cut out the squares that contain the four pictures you have coloured in.

Remember to cut out very carefully.

When you have cut out the 4 squares that contain your pictures, put them in a safe place, tick the box and go to Number 5.

5. (a) Carefully colour in the flower that is already in the Easter Box outline.
This flower is on the bottom of your Easter Box.

(b) Carefully colour in the basket of Easter Eggs that is already on the Easter Box outline.

(c) Complete the greeting – (To _____ and From _________)

When you have coloured in the flower, and completed the greeting, tick the box and go to Number 6.

Easter art craft activity reading lesson school
Easter Message in an Easter Box - Student Task Sheet 3 of 4


Print the above image and use with Student Task Sheets 1, 2 and 4, the Easter Box Outline Sheet, the sheet of Easter pictures and the Tutor Notes pages 1 and 2.

Printing Instructions
page 3
6. (a) Look at the Easter Box outline.

(b) Notice the 4 boxes that have arrows in them.
The arrows are telling you which way your pictures need to be glued onto the Easter Box.

Study the diagram below.
It shows which way the pictures need to be glued onto the outline.
The 4 pictures used here are the same.
You will have four different pictures to glue on to your Easter Box outline.

(c) Place your 4 pictures onto your Easter Box outline.

Before you glue ask someone else (please) to check and make sure your pictures are facing the correct way.

(d) Carefully glue your pictures onto your Easter Box outline.
Make sure each picture fits inside the square on your Easter Box outline.

When you have glued the 4 Easter pictures onto your Easter Box outline tick the box.
Wait until the glue is dry and then go to Number 7.

Note: You will need to wait until the glue is dry before you continue to make your Easter Box.

Easter art craft activity reading lesson
Easter Message in an Easter Box - Student Task Sheet 4 of 4


Print the above image and use with Student Task Sheets 1, 2 and 3, the Easter Box Outline Sheet, the sheet of Easter pictures and the Tutor Notes pages 1 and 2.

Printing Instructions

7. Carefully cut on the solid black line
around the outline of your Easter Box.

When you have cut around the outline of your Easter Box tick the box and go to Number 8.

8. (a) Look at your Easter Box.

Notice the lines that are made up of dashes.
These are FOLD lines.

(b) Fold each line carefully and firmly on the dashes with the words and
pictures on the outside.

It’s important to make sure you fold exactly on the dashes.
This will make sure your box folds into a perfect cube.

When you have completed folding all the fold lines tick the box and go to Number 9.

9. Fold your Easter Box into a cube so you can see what it will look like when you have glued the tabs.
Then:
(a) Glue tab 1.
(b) Glue tab 2.
(c) Make sure they are glued exactly right and hold them until they stay firm.
(d) Glue tab 3.
(e) Glue tab 4.
(f) Make sure they are glued exactly right and hold them until they stay firm.

When you have glued the four tabs tick the box and go to Number 10.

10. Your teacher will Guide you through this step.

You will write an Easter message or have a small gift to put into your
Easter Box.

When you have the surprise inside your Easter Box tick the box and go to Number 11.

11. All you have to do now is glue the lid down.

(a) Do not glue yet.
Put the lid down so you can see how it will look when you glue it.
The tabs should fit inside the box.

(b) Put glue onto the tabs and glue into place.



Easter art craft activity reading lesson
Easter Message in an Easter Box - Easter Box Outline

Print the above image and use with Student Task Sheets 1, 2, 3 and 4, the sheet of Easter pictures and the Tutor Notes pages 1 and 2.

Printing Instructions


Easter art craft activity reading lesson
Easter Message in an Easter Box - Easter Pictures Sheet

Print the above image and use with Student Task Sheets 1, 2, 3 and 4, the Easter Box outline sheet and the Tutor Notes pages 1 and 2.

Printing Instructions



Easter activity art craft reading
Easter Message in an Easter Box - Tutor Notes page 1

Print the above image and use with Student Task Sheets 1, 2, 3 and 4, the Easter Box Outline Sheet, the sheet of Easter pictures and the Tutor Notes page 2.

Printing Instructions

Easter Box (1)
Notes for Tutor:

The following Easter Activity integrates reading for a purpose, comprehension, extending reading vocabulary, following instructions, problem solving, art and craft, fine motor skills, maths, spelling, hand writing and writing (messages) and being encouraged to produce work of a personal best standard.

Reading, understanding and following written instructions is an important comprehension skill for children to master.
Putting in the effort to produce a carefully crafted Easter Box develops pride in one’s work. Children realise that good results are often the product of effort.
The children follow instructions as per the student work sheets to make an Easter Box to give to a relative or friend. A short message and/or gift is put inside the box.

Using the student’s work sheets helps keep the child on task and encourages the child to work independently.

Note: If your class has proficient readers each child will be able to read and follow the instructions with
minimal help.
If your class has beginning readers you may wish to proceed with the whole class, reading and then
working one step at a time.

Hint: If you have young children in your class, parent helpers are invaluable during a high activity lesson
such as this.

This activity can also easily be integrated with:
o Literature: Before working the activity read an Easter Story or poem.
o Music: Work this activity before or after learning an appropriate Easter song.
o Oral Expression: Work this activity before or after learning/reading an Easter poem.
e.g. Poems about the Easter Bunny and Easter Chicken are available.
o Writing: Work this activity and then encourage children to write a narrative or poem about the Easter Bunny or Easter Chicken.
Drama: Work this activity – divide the class into small groups - each group develops a short play or skit with Easter Bunny as the central character. (best results follow a class discussion which
gives children ideas to develop)
o Research: about Easter – how it started, how it is celebrated in different cultures.
o Punctuation: Discuss the use of the apostrophe for
e.g. that’s, let’s, it’s in the rabbit’s speech bubbles.
o Physical Education: hopping like a rabbit, learn the ‘Chicken Dance’.

Record Keeping: Observing children during these activities could help you with your records.

Materials needed for each child for this activity:

1 Easter Box outline sheet 1 sheet of Easter pictures the student work sheets
1 pair of scissors
1 box of sharpened coloured pencils
1 sharpened lead pencil
1 eraser
1 glue stick
Materials needed for each child to write a message/or a small gift (I suggest a small chocolate Easter Egg) to put into each Easter Box.


Easter activity art craft reading
Easter Message in an Easter Box - Tutor Notes page 2

Print the above image and use with Student Task Sheets 1, 2, 3 and 4, the Easter Box Outline Sheet, the sheet of Easter pictures and the Tutor Notes page 1.

Printing Instructions

Before the activity begins: (2)

o You will need to decide how many sessions the activities will take.
I suggest:
• Session One - Work Sheet numbers 1- 6 (pages 1, 2 and 3).
(Time needs to be given for the glue to dry.)
• Session Two complete the box – Work Sheet numbers 7 – 11 (page 4).
• Session Three (which could be in between Session One and Two) creating the message to go into the box.

o It is a good idea for you to make an Easter Box before the children work the activity, to familiarise yourself with the process:
• This alerts you to any difficulties the children might face.
• You will be able to show it to the children as a model.
• It would be a good idea to make it without the pictures. Then the children can’t copy your ideas.
• You can use it to demonstrate any special points you wish to make.

o You will need to decide if each child is going to write a message to put into his/her Easter Box or if you are going to provide/organise a small gift to go into the box or perhaps both.

o If each child is going to write a message you will need to decide on the size of the paper each child will be given for this task. It will need to roll/fold into a size that will fit into the box.
• You can cut the paper to size or, if you have older children and would like to give them a challenge, you could leave the message writing until the box is made and let each child measure, cut and create a message to fit into his/her box.

o You may wish to use Art/Craft lesson time for the children to create their messages.
They could be encouraged to use fancy printing and borders around the message.

o Writing the Easter messages could be part of your Writing programme. Children will benefit from class discussions and the charting of appropriate words to help motivate work they can be proud of.
Plan ahead so the children have enough time to complete the task satisfactorily.


Suggestions:

Before you give the Work Sheets to the children show them the box you have already made
and explain they are going to read and follow Work Sheets to make an Easter Box of their own.
When you give the sheet of pictures to the children make sure they understand that they will need to choose only 4 squares for the Easter Box. Explain that the blank squares are there so they can draw their own Easter picture(s) if they wish.
It would be good to use the spare pictures for another Easter activity. They could be used to make an Easter Card, an Easter collage (group activity) or another Easter Box (children like to have a box for each parent or sibling – if applicable). Easter Boxes could be made and hung as a mobile.

Enjoy.



Easter Greetings
Wishing you a restful and safe holiday,

Glenys.


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Welcome Back to School

February 2nd 2015 08:47
back to school
Welcome Back to School
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Greetings: Happy New Year

December 31st 2014 06:08
new year greeting
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Christmas Chain and Christmas Rope

November 13th 2014 08:35
With the school year racing to a close Christmas Activities are a priority in the classroom.
I'm sure the children in your classroom are excited about Christmas and decorative Christmas art/craft activities are transforming your classroom.


This year I have created two reading, art/craft activities to help decorate your classroom.

They:
(a) give you some simple ideas for decorating your classroom to
fit in with the Christmas theme.
You can choose the level of activity that is suitable for the
children in your class.
(b) integrate reading, comprehension, following written
instructions, following instructions given in the form of a
diagram, mathematics, art/craft, social studies (traditions)
and problem solving skills.
(c) help the development of fine motor skills.
(d) allow each child to work at his/her individual level of
development.
(e) give children practise at working cooperatively with a partner.


The activities are presented as separate units so each one can be used individually if desired.


ENJOY

christmas art craft reading
Christmas Paper Chain Activity Worksheet1


Print the above image and use with Christmas Paper Chain Activity Worksheet 2 and Tutor Notes.

Printing Instructions

Christmas Decorations

Paper Chains

Today you are going to make Christmas paper chains to hang in your classroom.
You are going to work with a partner.

Hint: Work carefully. The more careful you are as you make your paper chain
the better it will look when you have it completed.

After your teacher has helped organise who is going to be your partner read and follow the following instructions.

1. To make your paper chain you will need:

You and your partner will need to share a red sheet of A4 paper and a green sheet of A4 paper.
Decide who will have the red sheet and who will have the green sheet.

a pair of scissors each
a ruler each
a stapler to share
a lead pencil each
an eraser each


When you have collected all of these materials and you are ready to begin, tick the box and go on to number 2.

2. Take your ruler and measure the longest side of your piece of paper.

How long is it? Write your answer here.

Task Challenge:

(a) You need your piece of paper to be 28cms long.
Discuss with your partner how you are going to achieve this task.

(b) When you are confident you have the solution to this challenge measure and cut your paper so it is 28cms long.

When you have measured and cut your piece of paper so it is 28 cms long, tick the box and go to number 3.

christmas art craft decorations
Christmas Paper Chain Activity Worksheet 2


Print the above image and use with Christmas Paper Chain Activity Worksheet 1 and Tutor Notes.

Printing Instructions

3. (a) You need to cut your sheet into 2cm strips so that you end up with 14 strips of paper ready to make into a paper chain.

Question:
If your strips of paper are going to be 2cms wide, how long will each strip be?

Discuss this problem with your partner and write your answer here.

Task Challenge:

(b) Discuss with your partner how you are going to measure and cut your sheet into 2cm strips so that you end up with 14 strips of paper ready to make into a paper chain.

(c) When you are confident you have the solution to this challenge measure and cut your paper so you have 14 strips of paper ready to make into a paper chain.

(d) Have you measured carefully and cut neatly? Yes? No?


When you have measured and cut your piece of paper so you have fourteen 2cms strips, tick the box and go to number 4.

4. Before continuing read all of the following instructions:

(a) Work with your partner.
Your paper chain will be made using the strips of paper.
Staple one strip of paper into a circle to make the first link in your chain.
Thread another strip through the first link and staple it into a circle.
Continue doing this until all of your strips are used.

(b) Before you begin stapling, work out with your partner a pattern for the red and green links that will make up your chain.
For example, you could decide to have 1green, 1 red, 1 green, 1 red,
or you could have 2 red, 2 green, 2 red, 2 green.

(c) After you have decided on the pattern you are going to use, staple your strips into a paper chain.

When you have finished your paper chain tick the box and go to number 5.

Congratulations. You have finished your paper chain.

5. Take your chain to your teacher so it can be used as part of the Christmas
decorations in your classroom.




christmas art craft reading
Christmas Paper Rope Activity Worksheet 1


Print the above image and use with Christmas Paper Rope Activity Worksheet 2 and Tutor Notes.

Printing Instructions

Christmas Decorations

Paper Rope

Today you are going to fold crepe paper to make a Christmas decoration to
hang in your classroom.

Hint: Work carefully. The more careful you are as you make your Christmas decoration the better it will look when you have it completed.

Read and follow these instructions.

1. To make your paper chain you will need:
a green strip of crepe paper
a red strip of crepe paper
a stapler
durex tape

When you have collected the materials and you are ready to begin,
tick the box and go on to number 2.



2. Take your two strips of crepe paper and place the end of one piece, at right angles over the end of the other strip of crepe paper and staple them together.

When you have stapled the two strips of crepe paper together, as shown in the diagram, tick the box and go on to number 3.

christmas art craft decorations
Christmas Paper Rope Activity Worksheet 2


Print the above image and use with Christmas Paper Rope Activity Worksheet 1 and Tutor Notes.

Printing Instructions

3. Are you ready for a challenge?
Read the instructions and study the diagrams until you know what to do.
(a) Fold strip 2 tightly over strip 1.
Press firmly along the fold.

(b) Now fold strip 1 over the top of strip 2.
Press firmly along the fold.

(c) Fold strip 2 back over strip 1.
Press firmly along the fold.
(d) Fold strip 1 back over strip 2.
Press firmly along the fold.

(e) Keep folding using this pattern until you have no paper left to fold.
(f) Firmly tape or staple the ends together.
----------------------------- --------------------
(g) Hold both ends of the folded papers and gently pull to stretch your folds
into a paper rope.

When you have completed your decoration, tick the box.

Congratulations. You have finished your Christmas decoration.




teaching notes reading christmas
Tutor Notes for Christmas Paper Chain and Christmas Paper Rope - page 1


Print the above image and use with Tutor Notes page 2, Christmas Paper Chain Worksheets and/or Christmas Rope Activity Worksheets.

Printing Instructions

Decorating a Christmas Classroom
Paper Chains and Paper Rope

The following activities:
(a) give you some simple ideas for decorating your classroom to fit in with the Christmas theme.
Choose the level of activity that is suitable for the children in your class.
(b) integrate reading, comprehension, following written instructions, following instructions given in the form of a diagram, mathematics, art/craft, social studies (traditions)
and problem solving skills.
(c) help in the development of fine motor skills.
(d) allow each child to work at his/her individual level of development.
(e) give children practise at working cooperatively with a partner.


The activities are presented as separate units so each one can be used individually if desired.


Activity One: Paper Chains:

This activity makes paper chains to be used as Christmas decorations.

Each child is given the activity sheets for making paper chains.

This activity can be used with children at various stages of development:

(a) The class works as a whole, reading each section and working it together.
You know the development of the children in your class.
Give as much help as they need to succeed.

(b) Read each section with the whole class.
Make sure the children understand what is required and then leave them to work the task.
Give help only as needed.

(c) The children divide into pairs and each pair works independently, reading and completing the tasks.
Give help only as needed.

When the children have completed making the paper chains decide how you are going to use them in the classroom. A longer chain can be achieved by joining all the chains together. (You will need to have a few extra strips of paper on hand for joining the smaller chains together.)

Activity Two: Paper Ropes:

This activity makes paper ropes to be used as Christmas decorations.

Each child is given the activity sheets for making paper ropes.

You will need to have the red and green crepe paper cut into strips before the beginning of the lesson.

Warning: The folding of the paper strips can be quite a challenge for some children.

Children who finish more quickly than most may like to make two ropes.

teaching notes reading christmas
Tutor Notes for Christmas Paper Chain and Christmas Paper Rope - page 2


Print the above image and use with Tutor Notes page 2, Christmas Paper Chain Worksheets and/or Christmas Rope Activity Worksheets.

Printing Instructions

Note:

Using work sheets to give the children instructions for completing a given task and ticking the box as each section is completed provides multiple benefits:

Some of these benefits I have found are:
• reading is integrated with other subject areas.
• the children are reading for a purpose.
• the children are kept on task.
• it gives the children valuable practise at reading and following instructions.
• comprehension skills are enhanced.
• the child is encouraged to work independently.
• children are taught the value of completing each stage of a task correctly before moving onto the next stage.
• the child is taught to be methodical
• the child experiences a sense of achievement and pride in his/her work.
• it allows the child to evaluate his/her own work.


Happy Decorating











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