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Welcome to Phonics.net.au

This website offers a free, comprehensive and sequential phonic program for teaching children how to read. It is split into eight sections (including Phonic Packs) which are designed to be completed in order, however, each lesson is self contained and it's possible to pick and choose.

Each section is written so the lessons/activities can be stapled together to make a student booklet. Each section comes with detailed Tutor Notes.
To access each section click below.

You may also find the following posts useful in making the most of this Phonic program.


Why Teach Phonics?
What is in each Phonic Pack?
Lesson Schedules

You can also access types of lessons such as Single Sounds or Digraphs by scrolling down the menu on the left.

Continue reading to find out more about this program.



My name is Glenys Deutscher.

I am a school teacher with 37 years experience and over the years it has been my privilege to teach all Primary School Year Levels, from Kindergarten to Year 7.

I have been inspired to write these Phonic Books because I believe that systematic phonic instruction is the most successful way to teach children how to read and spell. Once children learn the sound for each letter of the alphabet, and can sound out three letter words, a whole new world of reading is opened up for them. Their confidence grows as they realise they can read and they soon learn to sound out longer words. The ability to read words fluently and with confidence improves reading comprehension. I have taught Year One children for many years and am convinced that a systematic phonic based programme enhances children’s reading progress. Each year I taught Year One, I had children who were non readers at the beginning of the year, progress to a reading age of over 8 years. Similar progress can also be tracked with Year 2 and Year 3 children whom I have taught with the phonic based programme. I have also used this programme to help older children who have been struggling with reading, with beneficial results.

I have written these Phonic Packs for parents (or other care givers) to work with a child because I am convinced there are many advantages for both child and parent to work through the programme together. Each year I have worked with many supportive parents whose positive input has improved their children’s learning.

Teachers and tutors will also find the lessons invaluable as they progressively and systematically work through a direct phonic programme. These lessons are sequential, so moving progressively through the phonic books could be your phonic programme (already written for you). However, each lesson stands alone, so if you do not want to move through the programme lesson by lesson you can choose which lessons are applicable to your classroom/teaching situation. Feel free to cut and paste.

Children not only need to learn how to read, they also need to be able to comprehend what they are reading. I have included a simple comprehension exercise at the end of each lesson to encourage the development of comprehension skills.

To be a fluent reader children also need to be able to confidently recognise common sight (look-say) words, so lessons introducing appropriate sight words are included in the Phonic Packs.

To help develop children's writing skills I have integrated simple punctuation exercises in to the Phonic Packs, and lessons encouraging the correct spelling of common words are included in Phonic Packs 5 and 6.

To encourage children to spell words correctly when they are writing, and to help children develop good dictionary skills, I have included a simple personal dictionary, which should be used when a child's writing skills develop to the stage where he/she is writing simple sentences.

To access the complete Phonic Packs click on the links in the menu to the left.

If you are searching for a specific type of activity (eg digraphs, reading sheets, initial sounds) scroll down the categories which can also be found (near the top) to the left. Some of the lessons in these categories are extension lessons which integrate reading with other learning areas and do not appear in the Phonic Packs eg Christmas, Easter, Writing Activities.

It is so important for children to be confident readers. It is my desire that this programme will help parents/teachers/tutors to empower children to achieve this goal.


If you have any questions please leave a comment on the questions page.


Happy reading,
Glenys Deutscher.

A number of people have enquired about ordering a hard copy of the phonic packs to save on printing costs and time.
To place an order:
1. Select your Phonic Pack
2. Click on the button below.


Select Your Phonic Pack:



NB: The following posts are the latest lessons/activities I have added to phonics.net.au. To access whole Phonic Packs click on the appropriate 'cover page' picture at the beginning of this site. For specific categories, click on the appropriate category/ies to the (top) left of this site.

NB: I will be out of the office from 18th March to 4th May, 2014. Any orders received during these dates will be posted ASAP after the 4th May.



ANZAC Day

April 7th 2014 09:00
anzac cove
Anzac Cove, getting ready for the 25th April dawn celebrations.


dawn service anzac cove
Dawn Service at Anzac Cove


Useful Information:

Each year I gather news items and photos about the ANZACS and pin them up in the classroom for observation and/or discussion. I keep the best clips in a folder so the information can be used for future studies about this important day in Australia's calendar.

the man with the donkey
John Simpson Kirkpatrick's Grave (the man with the donkey)


Lone Pine Gallipoli
Lone Pine, Gallipoli





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Anzac Biscuits

April 2nd 2014 08:25
To discover other ANZAC Day activities go to the left of the top blog and (under 'Phonic Packs') click on the category 'Anzac Day - Reading Activities.

Children love to cook and ANZAC biscuits are easy to make. This activity integrates reading into other Learning Areas:
reading for a purpose
a recipe - looking at the different forms of writing
cooking
science - changing from one state (raw) into another (cooked)
health and hygiene - washing hands before cooking, using clean utensils
safety first - handling things that are hot
writing - a letter to a soldier
handwriting - always neat with properly formed letters
reading and following instructions
mathematics - dividing the biscuits up evenly among class members


anzac biscuits cooking reading activity
ANZAC Biscuit Recipe


Print above image.

Printing Instructions

ANZAC BISCUITS
We make ANZAC biscuits to help us celebrate ANZAC Day.
During World War 1 wives, relatives and friends sent ANZAC biscuits to soldiers serving overseas. This recipe was chosen because the biscuits kept well for quite a while and did not easily spoil while travelling to the soldiers.

Ingredients:

1 cup rolled oats
½ cup sugar
1cup desiccated coconut
1 cup plain flour (sifted)
1 level teaspoon bicarb soda
2 tablespoons golden syrup
125gr butter
2 tablespoons water



Method:

1. Preheat oven to 150 degrees C
2. Grease the oven/ biscuit tray you are going to cook the biscuits on
or
line the tray with baking paper

3. Put the rolled oats, sugar, coconut and sifted flour into a basin and mix
well

4. Put the butter, water and golden syrup into a small saucepan and stir over
a low heat until the butter is fully melted
5. Remove from the heat and stir in the bicarb soda
6. Mix well

7. Pour into the dry ingredients and mix well until fully combined

8. Using a teaspoon, drop small pieces of mixture onto the oven/biscuit tray
9. Press down slightly with a fork
10. Bake in a moderate oven (150 degrees C) until golden brown.






anzac biscuits cooking reading activity teacher notes
Tutor Notes for ANZAC Biscuits


Print above image.

Printing Instructions

ANZAC Biscuits - Notes for Tutor:

Before any cooking activity it is essential that you have your records up to date for any allergies the children in your class may have.
A note home to parents informing them of the cooking activity and the ingredients the children will be using and eating is a good idea – I consider it a must.
I get the note, giving permission for their child to be part in this cooking and eating activity, signed by the parents and returned to the school.

If your situation allows it, divide the class into two groups.
Have an adult (teacher assistant or parent) supervise the activity with the second group.
You will need the ingredients from one recipe for each group.

Each child is given a copy of the recipe.
Discuss how recipes are written.
How is it different to other forms of writing?
Read through the recipe with the children before you start the activity (this can be a whole class activity before you divide into groups)

Discuss with the children why you are making ANZAC biscuits.
Ideally this activity will follow other ANZAC Day discussions and activities so the children already understand why we celebrate ANZAC Day.

The children should wash their hands before handling food (integration into the Health Learning Area).

The ingredients can be brought to school in their packaging for the children to observe.

Read each step of the Method as you go.

Each child in the group should be given a turn to tip, measure or mix.

Measuring the ingredients is a practical activity which integrates into the Maths Learning Area.

Making children aware to be careful of the hot oven, oven/biscuit tray and even the biscuits when they are hot integrates this activity into the Health and Safety Learning area.

Observing the mixture as it changes while cooking integrates this activity into the Science Learning Area.

During all cooking activities the children are learning to share and wait for their turn.

Being well organised and having the lesson worked out step by step in your mind before you begin is essential for the smooth running and success of this activity.

When the biscuits are cooked and cooled they can be counted and divided evenly among the children (integration into the Maths Learning Area).

If the children are going to take any of the biscuits home to share with their families having enough foil for each child to wrap them in is a good idea.

Extension Activity:
Each child could imagine he/she is the parent of a soldier who is fighting at Gallipoli and she/he has made some ANZAC biscuits to send. Each child could write a letter to accompany the parcel of ANZAC biscuits.
The letters could be read at a school assembly.

Enjoy !!

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Easter Messages in an Easter Egg

March 7th 2014 13:18
The reading activity I have prepared for you this Easter I have titled -

Easter Messages in an Easter Egg

This activity integrates reading for a purpose, comprehension, art and craft, following instructions, development of fine motor skills, maths, spelling, hand writing and writing (messages).

----------------------------- ----------------------------- -----------------

To access other exciting Easter activities go to the categories to the left of the top blog and click on the category -- 'Easter' --.

The activities you will find as you scroll down in this folder are:
1. Easter in the Classroom
2. Easter Basket and Easter Eggs (cooking)
3. Easter Riddles
4. Rabbit Mask
5. Making smaller wards from the word "Easter"
6. An Easter Book for emerging readers.
7. What is inside this Easter Egg?


----------------------------- ----------------------------- ----------------

Easter Messages in an Easter Egg


Easter activity art craft reading
Easter Messages in an Easter Egg - Student Task Sheet 1 of 3


Print the above image.

Printing Instructions


Easter Messages in an Easter Egg page 1
Today you are going to make an Easter Egg with Easter messages hidden inside.
Hint: Work carefully. The more careful you are as you make your Easter Egg and Easter Chicken the better they will look when you have completed them.

1. Collect the following materials for your Easter Egg and Easter Chicken:
1 Easter Egg back
1 page with the two parts to make the front of the Easter Egg
the Easter Chicken in its egg shell x the number of people in your family
1 pair of scissors
1 small paper fastener
lead pencil
eraser
coloured pencils
felt pens

Materials you will need and may have to share:
glue stick

When you have collected all the materials you need to make your Easter Egg and Easter Chicken, tick the box and go on to number 2.

2. (a) Look at the back of your Easter Egg.
(b) Decide how you are going to decorate it.
(c) Using a lead pencil draw the decoration on the egg.
Hint: Draw lightly with your lead pencil so it will not show when you
have coloured your decorations.
(d) Colour in your decorations.
(e) Admire your work.

When you have decorated the back of your Easter Egg, tick the box and go to number 3.

3. (a) Look at the two pieces that make up the front of your Easter Egg.
(b) Decide how you are going to decorate them.
(c) Using a lead pencil draw the decorations on the egg.
Hint: Draw lightly with your lead pencil so it will not show when you
have coloured your decorations.
(d) Colour in your decorations.
(e) Admire your work.

When you have decorated the two front pieces of your Easter Egg, tick the box and go to number 4.

Easter activity art craft reading
Easter Messages in an Easter Egg - Student Task Sheet 2 of 3


Print the above image.

Printing Instructions


4. Take the three pieces you need to make your Easter Egg and cut them out.
ALERT: It’s difficult to cut on the line when you are cutting
shapes that curve, so cut out slowly and carefully.

When you have finished cutting out the three pieces for your Easter Egg, tick the box and go to number 5.


5. (a) Take the back of your Easter Egg and place it decoration down.

(b) Take the bottom piece for the front of your Easter Egg and place it
decoration up on top of the back of the egg, so they match.

You are going to glue around the edge of the egg, where the pieces
meet, to make a pocket into which you can slip your Easter Chickens.

(c) Take the glue stick and glue the edges together.

*** ALERT: *** It is important to get this correct.
If you’re not sure check with your tutor before you glue.


When you have glued the bottom part of the front of your Easter Egg to the back of your Easter Egg, tick the box and go to number 6.


6. (a) While the glue is drying, colour in your Easter Chickens.
Leave the egg shells white, or colour them very lightly.
This is where you are going to write your Easter messages.
(b) Carefully cut out the Easter Chickens.

When you have coloured in and cut out all of your Easter Chickens, tick the box and go to number 7.


Easter art craft activity reading lesson
Easter Messages in an Easter Egg - Student Task Sheet 3 of 3


Print the above image.

Printing Instructions


7. (a) Take the top piece for the front of your Easter Egg and place it
decorations up, in place over the back of your Easter Egg.
(b) Make sure the little round circle on the top half of the Easter Egg
matches the little round circle on the bottom part of the Easter Egg.
(c) Push the paper fastener through the little round circles to the back of
the Easter Egg and secure. (You may need an adult to help you do this)


When you have completed (a), (b) and (c) above, tick the box and go to number 8.

8. (a) Take your Easter Chickens.
(b) Write an Easter message to each member of your family on the shell of
the egg belonging to the Easter Chicken. Remember to write neatly.
(c) Use a different chicken for each person.

When you have written all your messages, tick the box and go to number 9.

9. Slip the Easter Chickens into the pocket of your Easter Egg
and swing the top piece of the Easter Egg down
to hide the chickens.


When you have put all of your Easter messages inside your Easter Egg, tick the box and then give yourself a pat on the back for a job well done.

Congratulations! You have completed your Easter Egg
and it is full of Easter messages for your family.

Rate your Easter Egg:

OK Good Very Good





Easter art craft activity reading lesson
Easter Messages in an Easter Egg - Template 1 of 3


Print the above image.

Printing Instructions


Easter art craft activity reading lesson
Easter Messages in an Easter Egg - Template 2 of 3


Print the above image.

Printing Instructions


Easter art craft activity reading lesson school
Easter Messages in an Easter Egg - Template 3 of 3


Print the above image.

Printing Instructions





Easter art craft activity reading lesson
Tutor Notes for Easter Messages in an Easter Egg


Print the above image.

Printing Instructions


Easter Messages in an Easter Egg

Notes for Tutor:

The following Easter Activity integrates reading for a purpose, comprehension, art and craft, following instructions, development of fine motor skills, maths, spelling, hand writing and writing (messages).

The children follow instructions, as per lesson task sheets, to make an Easter Egg and write a short Easter message to each member of his/her family .

Materials needed for each child for this activity:

1 Easter Egg back (copied onto paper)
1 page with the two parts to make the front of the Easter Egg (copied onto paper)
the Easter Chicken in its egg shell x the number of people in the child’s family (copied)
1 pair of scissors
1 small paper fastener
lead pencil
eraser
coloured pencils
felt pens
glue stick
each child will need a copy of the Task Sheets (pages 1-3)

Note:
You may choose to copy the Easter eggs onto coloured paper.
You may choose to supply coloured self-adhesive dots, stars and other shapes for the children to use to decorate the Easter eggs.

Lessons:
• Depending on the maturity/development of the children in your class you may decide to spread this activity over two, three or four lessons. Decide how you are going to do this before you start.

• Before step 2 and 3 it is a good idea to discuss decorating the eggs with the children.
The results will be more satisfying if they have thought about this before they start designing the decorations for their eggs (stars, circles, stripes, curved lines etc)
• Designing and completing the decorating of the Easter Egg could be part of your Art/Craft programme. Plan ahead so the children have enough time to complete this task satisfactorily.

• Writing the Easter messages could be part of your Writing programme. Children will benefit from discussions and the charting of appropriate words to help motivate work she/he can be proud of.
Plan ahead so the children have enough time to complete this task satisfactorily.

Hint:
Organising parent/adult help for this activity may be a good idea.
The amount of help required will be determined by the maturity/development of the children in your class.
If you attempt this activity with a Year Two class, for instance, you may decide to keep the class together, reading each step together and working each step together (with lots of parent help).
If you are using this activity with a Year Three class, some of the children may be able to work independently, requiring minimal help and working as a ‘read and do’ activity.

Record keeping:
Observing the children during this activity could help you with your records.

Enjoy

Easter Greetings – Have a great holiday (GD)




18
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Welcome to the New School Year

January 23rd 2014 09:59
school phonics lessons
18
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christmas art craft reading
Lessons to help celebrate Christmas in the classroom (page1 of 2)


Christmas is Coming

Christmas is in the air and it’s an exciting time in the classroom.

So much of your programme can revolve around the Christmas Theme.

As soon as November arrives it is a good idea to begin your
Christmas activities so they can be completed and displayed before
you run out of time. Fourth Term passes so quickly.


The children are motivated and your classroom will look
attractive with the colourful displays.




Click on ‘Christmas’ in the categories to the left of the top blog to view
Christmas postings.
Scroll down to view all the Christmas Lessons and Activities.
All lessons include detailed Tutor Notes and Activities.


The Lessons to view are:

1. Christmas in the Classroom
(Introduction and a sample of a note to parents.)

2. ‘The Christmas Tree’. (A Christmas Story)
Each child can make an individual booklet. This story consists of 6
pages, each page being one lesson with a craft activity to follow.

3. The Nativity Story. This story consists of 3 pages, each page being one
lesson followed by a drawing activity (comprehension).

4. Create a Christmas Drawing. Each child follows
(reads and comprehends)
instructions to create a Christmas picture.
This activity is suitable for children of all ages because each child can
work and create at his/her own level.
(I have used this activity with children from Year One to Year Seven).



christmas art craft reading
Lessons to help celebrate Christmas in the classroom (page2 of 2)


5. Father Christmas Face:
Each child reads instructions to make a Father Christmas face.

6. Sequencing Activity: Each child puts 6 pictures in order to make the
story.
Using a Narrative Framework each child writes her/his own story,
using the pictures as a guide.

7. Christmas Decorations: Each child reads and follows instructions to
make hanging Christmas decorations.

8. Christmas Lantern for Older Children: Each child reads and follows
instructions to make the Christmas Lantern.

9. Christmas Card:
Each child reads and follows instructions to make the Christmas Card.

10. Letter from Santa: Children read the letter from Santa which instructs
them to draw a map of their house so he knows where to leave his
present.
They also write a letter in reply.

11. Christmas Octahedron: Each child reads and follows instructions to
make a Christmas Octahedron.


These Christmas activities integrate reading for a purpose with other
Learning Areas eg Comprehension, Art and Craft, Writing,
Mathematics, Society and Environment, Seasons of the Year,
development of fine motor skills, following instructions, taking pride in one’s work.


Remember: You will need to give the children time to produce
work they can be proud of.



Enjoy.

Happy Reading, and may the excitement and joy of Christmas be in
your classroom,

Glenys Deutscher.



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This booklet is a hands-on reading activity which gives each child the opportunity to make his/her own reading booklet.

The benefits of this activity are many: (including)
1. The child has a sense of ownership.
2. It emphasises the medial sound 'u'.
3. The activity is/can be integrated with Art, Mathematics, Fine Motor
Skills, English (punctuation, speech bubbles, contractions), Science,
Physical Education.
4. The child is beginning to understand that stories are sequential.
5. It is expanding the child’s reading and speaking vocabulary.
6. The benefits of working with a caring adult are immeasurable.


reading lessons
Five Funny Bugs - page 1 of 4

Print the above image and use with the other pages of 'Five Funny Bugs' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs'.

Printing Instructions

reading book teaching reading
Five Funny Bugs - page 2 of 4

Print the above image and use with the other pages of 'Five Funny Bugs' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs'.

Printing Instructions

reading book teaching reading medial sound 'u'
Five Funny Bugs - page 3 of 4

Print the above image and use with the other pages of 'Five Funny Bugs' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs'.

Printing Instructions

medial sound 'u'
Five Funny Bugs - page 4 of 4

Print the above image and use with the other pages of 'Five Funny Bugs' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs'.

Printing Instructions



tutor notes for reading book comprhension
Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs' - page 1 of 5

Print the above image and use with the booklet pages of 'Five Funny Bugs'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs'.

Printing Instructions

Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs'.
This book assumes the child knows the sound for each letter of the alphabet.

If this is not the case Phonic Pack One in www.phonics.net.au covers learning the sound for each letter in an exciting and interesting way.

This booklet, ‘Five Funny Bugs’ emphasises/consolidates the medial sound ‘u’ in three letter words.

Practise is also given at sounding out four and five letter words and learning to read some common look-say words.

NB: Medial sounds are covered in Phonic Pack One pages 75 - 81.
The medial sound ‘u’ is specifically covered in Phonic Pack One, page 81.

It would be beneficial, but not essential, to cover this lesson with your child before making up the ‘Five Funny Bugs’ booklet.

This lesson can be found in www.phonics.net.au by clicking on ‘Phonic Pack One’ in the top blog and scrolling down to page 81.

This hands on, reading activity can be/is integrated into several learning areas:
Art, Mathematics, Fine Motor Skills, English (punctuation, speech bubbles, contractions), Science, Physical Education.

To make up the ‘Five Funny Bugs’ booklet:

1. Print the four A4 pages for the ‘Five Funny Bugs’ Booklet.
2. Ask your child to look at the four A4 pages and explain that each page contains 4 ‘smaller pages’ which, when cut out, will make his/her own special ‘Five Funny Bugs’ book.

3. Ask your child to count how many pages her/ his ‘Five Funny Bugs’ book will have altogether.

4. Ask your child to read the title. – (may need help)

5. Ask your child to colour in the letters that make up the title.
NB: Colouring in carefully and neatly helps improve fine motor skills.
Give your child time to achieve this task.

6. Ask your child to write her/his name on the line provided.

Make sure he/she is using the correct pencil hold, is forming the letters correctly and begins her/his name with a capital letter.
Explain that names begin with a capital letter.

7. Look at the pages and briefly discuss the pictures on each page with your child.
This is an important step – don’t miss it out.

The idea is to get the child talking, being observant, noticing what/who is in the picture, what he/she thinks each character is doing, expressing her/his own ideas about the pictures.

Note: Learning how to express his/her opinion and ideas is a special skill that improves with practise and is a prerequisite to writing down his/her ideas, opinions, stories etc.


tutor notes for reading book comprhension
Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs' - page 2 of 5

Print the above image and use with the booklet pages of 'Five Funny Bugs'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs'.

Printing Instructions

NB: Simple Comprehension:
It’s important for your child to understand/comprehend what
he/she is observing and reading.
This is a skill that is developed with practise.

At this stage of reading development it is good to have simple questions
to answer:
a) It is encouraging the child to think about what she/he is reading.
b) It is encouraging the child to put his/her thoughts in order to
express an appropriate answer.

Remember!! Learning how to express his/her opinion and ideas is a special skill that improves with practise and is a prerequisite to writing down his/her ideas, opinions, stories etc.

8. Go back to the page with the sentence, ‘One sunny day five funny bugs went for a run in the sun’. Observe and discuss with your child: (simple comprehension)
• How many bugs can we see?
• What are they? (snail, ant, ladybird, caterpillar, grasshopper)
• What are they doing?
• Read what each bug is saying – read together – let your child read the words she/he recognises and you quickly fill in the rest. Don’t labour the reading of the speech bubbles – keep it fluent – they are there to provide interest and fun. It is OK at this point if you read the speech bubbles.

9. Ask your child to look at the sentence written on this page and point to, and read, any words that he/she already recognises.

Point to any three letter word (that can be sounded out) your child does not recognise and encourage him/her to sound it out.
If your child has not had much practise at sounding out words you may need to model the correct way to do this.
ie - sound out each letter of the word separately eg r-u-n, then blend the sounds together until the child can hear the word.- ‘run’.

Repeat the above process with any word your child can sound out.

NB: Have a special look at the word ‘funny’.
Explain to your child that:
• when double letters occur when sounding out a word,
the sound of the letters is said only once (not twice)
• ‘y’ on the end of a word often says ‘ee’.
So, when sounding out the word ‘funny’, it sounds like – ‘f-u-n-ee’ -
funny and ‘muddy’ sounds like - ‘m-u-d-ee’ - muddy
(see if your child remembers this when you come to read the word,
‘muddy’.)

10. Now read the whole sentence with your child, pointing to each word as
you read.
Encourage your child to sound out any words she/he still doesn't recognize (if it’s a sounding word).
If it’s a ‘look-say’ word (one that can’t be sounded out) just tell your child what it is and move on. (eg one, day, five, for, the)

tutor notes for reading book comprhension
Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs' - page 3 of 5

Print the above image and use with the booklet pages of 'Five Funny Bugs'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs'.

Printing Instructions

11. Repeat numbers 8 (don’t forget appropriate simple comprehension questions) (read and discuss the speech bubbles), to 10 (as above) for each page (except the last page with the lists of words).
When you come to the pages that have words that rhyme, read the sentences to your child and ask him/her to tell you the words that rhyme. If your child has not done this before you will need to explain about words that rhyme. When you read the sentences emphasise the words that rhyme until your child can hear them. If your child has difficulty with this exercise give her/him extra practise. You say a word (eg mug) and she/he says a word that rhymes (eg bug).

The page with the sentence, ‘Draw the five funny bugs singing and
dancing and running in the sun after the gull had flown away and
they were safe’ is asking your child to draw this scene.
Give your child time to do this task properly:
• It is a comprehension exercise (does your child draw the correct 5 bugs)
• It is encouraging your child to use his/her imagination
• Your child has to use spacial awareness to fit the 5 bugs into the space
provided
• Drawing and colouring in neatly is helping to improve fine motor skills

12. Look at the last page.
Ask your child to point to, and read each list of words.
If your child can read the word without sounding it out this is GOOD.
Let your child put a tick next to these words.
If your child cannot read the word (be patient) ask him/her to sound it
out.

From time to time return to this page to give practise as needed.
When your child can confidently read a word, let her/him tick it.
Keep practising until all words have a tick.


13. Ask your child to cut on the straight lines to create the sixteen pages
that will make up the booklet.
NB: Encourage your child to cut out carefully.
With practise and concentration he/she should be able to cut on the line.
(fine motor skills)
This will help create a booklet your child can be proud of.

14. Ask your child to read the sentences on each page - continue to give help where necessary. If your child comes to a word he/she cannot read:
• encourage her/him to sound out the word if it can be sounded out –
just say ‘that is a word you can sound out’, and give him/her time to do so.
• if it’s a ‘look-say’ word (one that can’t be sounded out) just tell your child what it is and move on.

NB: Ask your child to point to the words as he/she reads the sentences.
This:
a. reinforces the left to right eye movement.
b. reinforces the fact that sentences and phrases are made up of words.
c. encourages the child to look at each word, so enhancing word recognition. (Otherwise the child is inclined to ‘parrot’ the sentences and is not learning to recognise the words.)



tutor notes for reading book comprhension
Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs' - page 4 of 5

Print the above image and use with the booklet pages of 'Five Funny Bugs'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs'.

Printing Instructions

15. Let your child decide the order the pages will be in his/her booklet.
Discuss with your child if it matters which order she/he decides upon –
of course the title page has to be first. (Why?)
This book tells a story and the pages have to be in order for the story
to make sense.
Let your child discover this.

The page which has the lists of words should be last. (Why?)

16. Staple the pages into a booklet.

17. Ask your child to number the pages.
This is best done in the top right hand corner of each page with a small,
neat number.
This is teaching the child that the pages of a book are (usually) numbered
sequentially.

If your child cannot write the numbers, write them (lightly) for her/him and let her/him trace over your numbers. (Say the number as you write it. Say it again as your child writes it.)

18. Simple Comprehension Exercise:

NB: It is important for your child to understand/comprehend what
he/she is reading.
This is a skill that is developed with practise.
At this stage of reading development it is good to have simple
oral questions to answer:
a) It is encouraging the child to think about what she/he has just
read or perhaps it’s a question that expands your child’s
general knowledge.
b) It is encouraging the child to put his/her thoughts in order to
express an appropriate answer.
Being able to put thoughts into order is an important
pre-requisite for writing.
(I can’t emphasise this enough.)

After reading this story, put it aside and ask your child simple
questions like:

How many funny bugs are there in this story?
Can you remember what they are?
Which one do you think would win a race? Why?
Which one do you think would come last in a race? Why?
Do you think the bugs are good friends? What makes you think so?
Who came looking for something to eat?
Can you remember where the bugs hid when the gull flew near them?
Which bug hid in the hut? the nut? the bud? the mud? the tree?
How do we know it was a fine sunny day?
(Your child may like to draw a sun in the sky on the first page of the story.)

19. Let’s go on a treasure hunt:
A fun way to practise the ‘look-say’ words which appear in this
booklet is to play this game with your child.
You say a word and see how quickly your child can find that word in
the booklet.
To start with, turn to a specific page of the booklet so your child
knows the word will be on that page.
As your child gains confidence and easily recognises the words, you
could use the whole booklet for a challenge.

It is essential to keep the game ‘moving’ and make it enjoyable for the
child – work at his/her level – not too many words at first – find the
same word on a different page - confidence comes with success.

tutor notes for reading book comprhension
Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs' - page 5 of 5

Print the above image and use with the booklet pages of 'Five Funny Bugs'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs'.

Printing Instructions

NB: a ‘look-say’ word is a word that cannot be sounded out e.g. hungry, flew, wooden, rose, out.
Some of the words your child cannot easily sound out now will become words he/she can sound out when he/she learns digraphs (that is two letters together that make a sound eg ou, ch, sh,).

When reading, the child uses the ‘sense of the sentence’ to help him/her read ‘look-say’ words.
Eg. he, she, the, to are look-say words but are usually easily added to the child’s reading vocabulary because they appear so often in a text.

As well as sounding out the three letter words that can be sounded out, encourage her/him to sound out four and five letter words that can be sounded out.eg went, funny, crept, muddy .

A beneficial exercise for your child:
a. Print off a spare booklet.
b. Cut the sentences from each page and put them in random order.
c. Encourage your child to match each sentence to the sentence which is
the same in the booklet he/she has made.
d. Read the sentence.

When your child is competent with this exercise:
a. Take the sentences, one at a time.
b. Cut them into words.
c. Put the words in jumbled order.
d. Encourage your child to rearrange the words into a sentence.
e. Read the sentence.
NB: If your child needs help, let her/him refer to the little booklet.
It’s good when your child can do this without referring to the booklet.
It’s a sign that she/he is actually reading the words.

20. Integrate with:
Mathematics: counting and numbering the pages in the booklet, fitting the drawing of the five funny bugs into the space provided on the last page of the story (spacial awareness), ordinal numbers (first to fifth).

Punctuation: discuss the full stop at the end of each sentence, observe that sentences begin with a capital letter, observe that all names begin with a capital letter.
Observe and discuss the ‘?’ and ‘!’.
Observe and discuss the apostrophe used in
contractions eg can’t, didn’t, I’ve, I’ll, let’s.

Art: drawing the five bugs dancing after the gull had flown away.

Science: Study insects and the life cycle of an insect.
Study snails.

English:Words that rhyme, speech bubbles, contractions
(eg can’t, didn’t etc)

Physical Education: caterpillar walk (humpy – if you have a suitable surface
the children could roll like the caterpillar in the story),
hop like a grasshopper, run like an ant,
move like a snail (let your child use his/her
imagination), fly like a gull looking for bugs to eat –
swoop down to pick up a crumb left over from a picnic,
sway like a tree in the breeze,
‘make yourself into the shape of the big, wooden hut’, ‘make yourself into a beautiful, red rose bud – slowly open out into a beautiful red rose’ (could have both for children to observe), use suitable music and ask children to dance like the bugs after the gull flew away, make up a ‘happy bug dance’.

Enjoy




19
Vote
   


This booklet is a hands-on reading activity which gives each child the opportunity to make his/her own reading booklet.

The benefits of this activity are many: (including)
1. The child has a sense of ownership.
2. It emphasises the medial sound 'o'.
3. The activity is/can be integrated with Art, Mathematics, Fine Motor
Skills, Punctuation, English, Oral English, Science and learning about
speech bubbles.
4. The child is beginning to understand that stories are sequential.
5. It is expanding the child’s reading and speaking vocabulary.
6. The benefits of working with a caring adult are immeasurable.


reading book teaching reading
Molly Has a Dog... - page 1 of 2

Print the above image and use with the other pages of 'Molly Has a Dog...'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog ...'.

Printing Instructions

reading book teaching reading
Molly Has a Dog... - page 2 of 2

Print the above image and use with the other pages of 'Molly Has a Dog...'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog ...'.

Printing Instructions





phonics medial sound 'o'
Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog...' - page 1 of 5

Print the above image and use with the booklet pages of 'Molly Has a Dog...'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog ...'.

Printing Instructions

Tutor Notes - page 1
This book assumes the child knows the sound for each letter of the alphabet.

If this is not the case Phonic Pack One in www.phonics.net.au covers learning the sound for each letter in an exciting and interesting way.

This booklet, ‘Molly Has a Dog …’, emphasises/consolidates the medial sound ‘o’ in three letter words.
Practise is also given at sounding out four letter words and learning to read some common look-say words.

NB: Medial sounds are covered in Phonic Pack One pages 75 - 81.
The medial sound ‘o’ is specifically covered in Phonic Pack One, page 80.

It would be beneficial, but not essential, to cover this lesson with your child before making up the ‘Molly Has a Dog…’ booklet.

This lesson can be found in www.phonics.net.au by clicking on ‘Phonic Pack One’ in the top blog and scrolling down to page 80.

To make up ‘Molly Has a Dog …’ booklet:

1. Print the two A4 pages for the ‘Molly Has a Dog …’ Booklet.

2. Ask your child to look at the two A4 pages and explain that each page
contains 4 ‘smaller pages’ which, when cut out, will make his/her own
special ‘Molly Has a Dog …’ book.

3. Ask your child to count how many pages her/ his ‘Molly Has a Dog …’
book will have altogether. (8)

4. Ask your child to read the title. – (may need help)

Why is the title followed by three dots?
(Because the sentence is not complete – there is more to come.)


5. Ask your child to write her/his name on the line provided.

Make sure he/she is using the correct pencil hold, is forming the letters correctly and begins her/his name with a capital letter.
Explain that names begin with a capital letter.

6. Look at the pages and briefly discuss the pictures on each page with
your child.
This is an important step – don’t miss it out.

The idea is to get the child talking, being observant, noticing what/who is in the picture, what he/she thinks each character is doing, expressing her/his own ideas about the pictures.
.
Note: Learning how to express his/her opinion and ideas is a special skill that improves with practise and is a prerequisite to writing down his/her ideas, opinions, stories etc.


phonics medial sound 'o'
Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog...' - page 2 of 5

Print the above image and use with the booklet pages of 'Molly Has a Dog...'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog ...'.

Printing Instructions

Tutor Notes - page 2
NB: Simple Comprehension:
It’s important for your child to understand/comprehend what
he/she is reading.
This is a skill that is developed with practise.

At this stage of reading development it is good to have simple
questions to answer:
a) It is encouraging the child to think about what she/he is reading.
b) It is encouraging the child to put his/her thoughts in order to
express an appropriate answer.

Remember!! Learning how to express his/her opinion and ideas is a special skill that improves with practise and is a prerequisite to writing down his/her ideas, opinions, stories etc.

7. Go back to the page with the sentence, ‘Molly has a dog called Rod’,
and discuss with your child: (simple comprehension)
• both names have a capital letter.
• the title of the book Molly is reading?
• why Molly would be reading a book with this title?
• what does she/he think Rod is thinking?


8. Ask your child to look at the sentence written on this page and point to,
and read, any words that he/she already recognises.

Point to any three letter word (that can be sounded out) your child does not recognise and encourage him/her to sound it out.
If your child has not had much practise at sounding out words you may need to model the correct way of doing this.
ie - sound out each letter of the word separately eg d-o-g, then blend the sounds together until the child can hear the word.- ‘dog’.

Repeat the above process with any word that can be sounded out.

NB: Have a special look at the word ‘Molly’.

Explain to your child that:
• when double letters occur when sounding out a word,
the sound of the letters is said only once (not twice)
• ‘y’ on the end of a word often says ‘ee’.
So, when sounding out the word Molly, it sounds like – ‘M-o-l-ee’ -
Molly and Hoppy sounds like - ‘H-o-p-ee’ - Hoppy (see if your child remembers this when you come to read the sentence, ‘Ron has a pet frog called Hoppy’.)


phonics medial sound 'o'
Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog...' - page 3 of 5

Print the above image and use with the booklet pages of 'Molly Has a Dog...'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog ...'.

Printing Instructions

Tutor Notes - page 3
9. Now read the whole sentence with your child, pointing to each word as
you read.
Encourage your child to sound out any words she/he still doesn’t
recognise (if it’s a sounding word).
If it’s a ‘look-say’ word (one that can’t be sounded out) just tell your child
what it is and move on. (eg called, out, for, likes)

10. Repeat numbers 7 (don’t forget appropriate simple comprehension questions) (read and discuss the speech bubbles) ,8 and 9 (as above) for each page (except the last page with the lists of words).
The page with the sentence, ‘It was so hot Tom and Bob had a swim in the pond’ has an empty swimming pool on the page. Ask your child to draw Tom and Bob having a swim in the pond.
11. Look at the last page.
Ask your child to point to, and read each list of words.
If your child can read the word without sounding it out this is GOOD.
Let your child put a tick next to these words.
If your child cannot read the word (be patient) ask him/her to sound it out.

From time to time return to this page to give practise as needed.
When your child can confidently read a word, let her/him tick it.
Keep practising until all words have a tick.

12. Ask your child to cut on the straight lines to create the eight pages
which will make up the booklet.
NB: Encourage your child to cut out carefully.
With practise and concentration he/she should be able to cut on the line.
This will help create a booklet your child can be proud of.


13. Ask your child to read the sentences on each page - continue to give
help where necessary.

If your child comes to a word he/she cannot read:
• encourage her/him to sound out the word if it can be sounded out –
just say ‘that is a word you can sound out’, and give him/her time to do so.
• if it’s a ‘look-say’ word (one that can’t be sounded out) just tell your child what it is and move on.

NB: Ask your child to point to the words as he/she reads the sentences.
This:
a. reinforces the left to right eye movement.
b. reinforces the fact that sentences and phrases are made up of words.
c. encourages the child to look at each word, so enhancing word
recognition. (Otherwise the child is inclined to ‘parrot’ the sentences and
is not learning to recognise the words.)





phonics medial sound 'o'
Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog...' - page 4 of 5

Print the above image and use with the booklet pages of 'Molly Has a Dog...'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog ...'.

Printing Instructions

Tutor Notes - page 4
14. Let your child decide the order the pages will be in his/her booklet.
Discuss with your child if it matters which order she/he decides upon –
of course the title page has to be first. (Why?)

Some books tell a story and the pages have to be in order for the story to make sense.
In this booklet the pages go in pairs.
Does your child see that there are two pages about each pair of characters - Molly and Rod - Tom and Bob - Ron and Hoppy.
Do the two pages for each pair have to be in a certain order to correctly tell the story about these characters?

Does the order of these pairs of pages matter?
Swap them around to decide.
The page which has the lists of words should be last. (Why?)

15. Staple the pages into a booklet.

16. Ask your child to number the pages.
This is best done in the top right hand corner of each page with a small,
neat number.
This is teaching the child that the pages of a book are (usually) numbered
sequentially.

17. Simple Comprehension Exercise:

NB: It is important for your child to understand/comprehend what
he/she is reading.
This is a skill that is developed with practise.
At this stage of reading development it is good to have simple
oral questions to answer:
a) It is encouraging the child to think about what she/he has just
read or perhaps it’s a question
that expands your child’s general knowledge.
b) It is encouraging the child to put his/her thoughts in order to
express an appropriate answer.
Being able to put thoughts into order is an important
pre-requisite for writing.
(I can’t emphasise this enough.)

After reading this story, put it aside and ask your child simple
questions like:

What is the name of Molly’s dog?
Do you think she looks after him properly?
What makes you think so? (She is reading about caring for a
puppy. He looks healthy and happy.)
How do you think Rod got into the pot?
How do you think Molly got him out?

Who does Bob belong to?
How often would Tom need to take him for a jog?
How do we know it was a hot day when Tom and Bob went for a jog?
(Your child may like to draw a sun in the sky on the page where they are
jogging.)

Who has a pet frog called Hoppy?
What do you think Hoppy was doing in the flower pot?
Would it be fun to have a pet frog?
How would it be different to having a pet dog or cat?


phonics medial sound 'o'
Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog...' - page 5 of 5

Print the above image and use with the booklet pages of 'Molly Has a Dog...'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog ...'.

Printing Instructions

Tutor Notes - page 5
18. Let’s go on a treasure hunt:
A fun way to practise the ‘look-say’ words which appear in this
booklet is to play this game with your child.
You say a word and see how quickly your child can find that word in
the booklet.
To start with, turn to a specific page of the booklet so your child
knows the word will be on that page.
As your child gains confidence and easily recognises the words, you
could use the whole booklet for a challenge.

It is essential to keep the game ‘moving’ and make it enjoyable for the
child – work at his/her level – not too many words at first – find the
same word on a different page - confidence comes with success.

NB: a ‘look-say’ word is a word that cannot be sounded out e.g. called,
out, for, was, put, likes.
.
When reading, the child uses the ‘sense of the sentence’ to help
him/her read ‘look-say’ words.
Eg. he, she, the, to are look-say words but are usually easily
added to the child’s reading vocabulary because they appear so
often in a text.

As well as sounding out the three letter words that can be
sounded out, encourage her/him to sound out the four letter words
that can be sounded out.eg went, swim, pond.

19. A beneficial exercise for your child:
a. Print off a spare booklet.
b. Cut the sentences from each page and put them in random order.
c. Encourage your child to match each sentence to the sentence which is
the same in the booklet he/she has made.
d. Read the sentence.

When your child is competent with this exercise:
a. Take the sentences, one at a time.
b. Cut them into words.
c. Put the words in jumbled order.
d. Encourage your child to rearrange the words into a sentence.
e. Read the sentence.
NB: If your child needs help, let her/him refer to the little booklet.
It’s good when your child can do this without referring to the booklet.
It’s a sign that she/he is actually reading the words.


20. Integrate with Maths: counting and numbering the pages in the booklet,
fitting the drawing of Tom and Bob swimming into the space of the
swimming pool.
Punctuation: discuss the full stop at the end of each sentence, observe
that sentences begin with a capital letter, observe that all names begin
with a capital letter.
Art: drawing Tom and Bob swimming in the pool, drawing a sun in
the appropriate picture.
Science: Talk about looking after pets, study the life cycle of a frog.

Enjoy




19
Vote
   


‘Little Books’ Reading Books is a work in progress.
It consists of several ‘little books’ designed to provide a child who is learning how to read, with booklets he/she can read with enjoyment and confidence.

As soon as a child begins to recognise words it is beneficial for him/her to be provided with books which have a limited and repeated vocabulary:
a. This gives the child confidence because she/he can ‘read’ the book.
b. The child learns to recognise the words that are repeated and so is
expanding her/his reading vocabulary.
c. A child loves to turn the pages and read a book, just like grownups.

Click on the heading 'Little Books for Emerging Readers' in the top blog of phonics.net.au to access other Little Books.


This booklet is a hands-on reading activity which gives each child the opportunity to make his/her own reading booklet.
The benefits of this activity are many: (including)
1. The child has a sense of ownership.
2. It emphasises the medial sound 'i'.
3. The activity is integrated with Mathematics, Punctuation and Art.
4. The child is beginning to understand that books have a title page.
5. It is expanding the child’s reading and speaking vocabulary.
6. The benefits of working with a caring adult are immeasurable.
7. A simple comprehension question is included at the bottom of each
page.
emerging readers reading book comprehension
'What do you think?' - page 1

Print above image and use with the 'What do you think?' - page 2 - and the Tutor Notes - pages 1-6.

Printing Instructions


emerging readers reading book comprehension
'What do you think?' - page 2

Print above image and use with the 'What do you think?' - page 1 - and the Tutor Notes - pages 1-6.

Printing Instructions



tutor notes for reading book comprehension
Tutor Notes for 'What do you think?' - page one

Print above image and use with the 'What do you think?' - pages 1 and 2 - and the Tutor Notes - pages 2-6.

Printing Instructions

This book assumes the child knows the sound for each letter of the alphabet.

If this is not the case Phonic Pack One in www.phonics.net.au covers learning the sound for each letter in an exciting and interesting way.

This booklet, ‘What do you think?’, emphasises/consolidates the medial sound ‘i’ in three letter words.
Practise is also given at sounding out four and five letter words.

NB: Medial sounds are covered in Phonic Pack One pages 75 - 81.
The medial sound ‘i’ is specifically covered in Phonic Pack One, page 79.

It would be beneficial, but not essential, to cover this lesson with your child before making up the ‘What do you think?’ booklet.

This lesson can be found in www.phonics.net.au by clicking on ‘Phonic Pack One’ in the top blog and scrolling down to page 79.

To make up ‘What do you think?’ booklet:

1. Print the two A4 pages for the ‘What do you think?’ Booklet.

2. Ask your child to look at the two A4 pages and explain that each page contains 4 ‘smaller pages’ which, when cut out, will make his/her own special ‘What do you think?’ book.

3. Ask your child to count how many pages her/ his ‘What do you think?’ book will have altogether. (8)

4. Ask your child to read the title.
Look at the question mark. Explain that a question mark is used at the end of a question.
Discuss with your child the fact that the question is in a speech bubble.
We know who is speaking because the speech bubble points to him/her.

Look at the ‘thinking bubble’.
We know it is a thinking bubble because it has bubbles pointing to the person who is thinking.

Can your child see the difference between the speech bubble (a character talking) and the thinking bubble (a character thinking)?

5. Ask your child to take a lead pencil, an eraser and a mirror and draw his/her face in the picture frame because this is her/his booklet and she/he is the one who is going to answer the question on each page of the booklet.


tutor notes for reading book comprhension
Tutor Notes for 'What do you think?' - page two

Print above image and use with the 'What do you think?' - pages 1 and 2 - and the Tutor Notes - pages 1 and 3-6.

Printing Instructions

Hint: Before your child draws his/her face ask him/her to look in a mirror and observe:
What shape is your face?
What colour is your hair?
Have you got straight/curly hair?
How long is your hair?
Look at your eyes. What colour are they? How far down your face are they?
What shape are they?
Where are your eye lashes?
Where are your eyebrows?
Where are your ears? What shape are they?
When you draw your face are your eyes going to be higher than your ears?
Look at your mouth? What shape are your lips?

Ask your child to observe how big the picture frame is and decide how big his/her face can be to fit in the frame. Fitting a specific drawing into a specified space is not always an easy task for a child to achieve.

When your child is satisfied with her/his drawing ask her/him to colour it in.
Use coloured pencils not felt pens.

Note: Your child will need time to do this activity properly.
You may need to allow one whole lesson time to achieve a good result.

----------------------------- ----------------------------- -----------------------------
Note: Your child may need more than one lesson to complete the following activities.
If necessary work one page at a time.
To gain maximum benefit for your child each page needs to done thoroughly.
You will be able to gauge when it is time to pause and return to the booklet latter.


6. Look at the pages and briefly discuss the pictures on each page with your child.
This is an important step – don’t miss it out.

The idea is to get the child talking, being observant, noticing what/who is in the picture, what he/she thinks each character is doing, expressing her/his own ideas about the pictures.
.
Note: Learning how to express his/her opinion and ideas is a special skill that improves with practise and is a prerequisite to writing down his/her ideas, opinions, stories etc.

7. Go back to the page where the pig and the imp are doing a jig.
Look at the characters.
Has your child noticed the imp’s hat is not coloured in?
Ask her/him to colour it in.

Note: colouring in neatly and within the shape provided helps improve fine motor skills.

tutor notes for reading book comprhension
Tutor Notes for 'What do you think?' - page three

Print above image and use with the 'What do you think?' - pages 1 and 2 - and the Tutor Notes - pages 1 and 2, and 4-6.

Printing Instructions

8. Ask your child to look at the question written on this page and point to, and read, any words that he/she already recognises.

Point to any three letter word (that can be sounded out) that your child does not recognise and encourage him/her to sound it out.
If your child has not had much practise at sounding out words you may need to model the correct way of doing this.
ie - sound out each letter of the word separately eg j-i-g, then blend the sounds together until the child can hear the word.- ‘jig’.

Repeat the above process with any word that can be sounded out.

9. Now read the whole question with your child, pointing to each word as you read.
Encourage your child to sound out any words she/he still doesn’t recognise (if it’s a sounding
word).
If it’s a ‘look-say’ word (one that can’t be sounded out) just tell your child what it is and move on. (eg do, you, of)

10. Simple Comprehension Exercise:
NB: It’s important for your child to understand/comprehend what he/she is reading.
This is a skill that is developed with practise.

At this stage of reading development it is good to have simple questions to answer:
a) It is encouraging the child to think about what she/he has just read.
b) It is encouraging the child to put his/her thoughts in order to express an appropriate
answer.
Being able to put thoughts into order is an important pre-requisite for writing.

At the end of each page in this booklet your child is asked to answer the question by choosing an appropriate answer from the boxes – yes no maybe.

Ask your child to draw a circle around the word she/he thinks best answers the question.

It’s important to discuss with your child why he/she chose that answer.

Remember!! Learning how to express his/her opinion and ideas is a special skill that improves with practise and is a prerequisite to writing down his/her ideas, opinions, stories etc.

11. Repeat numbers 8,9,10 (as above) for each page (except the last page with the lists of words)
Note: When you come to the appropriate page:
• ask your child to draw the twig Kim is using to dig for the fig.
• ask your child to finish drawing, then colour in Bill the Chimp’s tail.
• ask your child to draw a sun in the sky next to the mill.
• ask your child to colour in the fish that is swimming with Jill.
Make it as colourful as possible.



tutor notes for reading book comprhension
Tutor Notes for 'What do you think?' - page four

Print above image and use with the 'What do you think?' - pages 1 and 2 - and the Tutor Notes - pages 1-3, 5 and 6.

Printing Instructions

12. Look at the last page.
Ask your child to point to, and read each list of words.
If your child can read the word without sounding it out this is GOOD.
Let your child put a tick next to these words.
If your child cannot read the word (be patient) ask him/her to sound it out.

The last column has four and five letter words which can be sounded out.
Treat this as a challenge – children love a challenge – PRAISE all effort.

From time to time return to this page to give practise as needed.
When your child can confidently read a word, let her/him tick it.
Keep practising until all words have a tick.

13. Ask your child to cut on the straight lines to create the eight pages which will make up the
booklet.
NB: Encourage your child to cut out carefully.
With practise and concentration he/she should be able to cut on the line.
This will help create a booklet your child can be proud of.

14. Ask your child to read the sentences on each page - continue to give help where necessary. If your child comes to a word he/she cannot read:
• encourage her/him to sound out the word if it can be sounded out –
just say ‘that is a word you can sound out’, and give him/her time to do so.
• if it’s a ‘look-say’ word (one that can’t be sounded out) just tell your child what it is and move on. (eg do, you, of)

NB: Ask your child to point to the words as he/she reads the sentences.
This:
a. reinforces the left to right eye movement.
b. reinforces the fact that sentences and phrases are made up of words.
c. encourages the child to look at each word, so enhancing word recognition. (Otherwise the child is inclined to ‘parrot’ the sentences and is not learning to recognise the words.)

15. Let your child decide the order the pages will be in his/her booklet.
Discuss with your child if it matters which order she/he decides upon –
of course the title page has to be first. (Why?)

Some books tell a story and the pages have to be in order for the story to make sense.
In this booklet each page stands alone so it doesn’t matter what order the pages are in.
The page which has the lists of words should be last. (Why?)

16. Staple the pages into a booklet.


tutor notes for reading book comprhension
Tutor Notes for 'What do you think?' - page five

Print above image and use with the 'What do you think?' - pages 1 and 2 - and the Tutor Notes - pages 1-4 and 6.

Printing Instructions

17. Ask your child to number the pages.
This is best done in the top right hand corner of each page with a small, neat number.
This is teaching the child that the pages of a book are (usually) numbered sequentially.

18. Simple Comprehension Exercise:
NB: It is important for your child to understand/comprehend what he/she is reading.
This is a skill that is developed with practise.
At this stage of reading development it is good to have simple oral questions to answer:
a) It is encouraging the child to think about what she/he has just read or perhaps it’s a question that expands your child’s general knowledge.
b) It is encouraging the child to put his/her thoughts in order to express an appropriate answer.
Being able to put thoughts into order is an important pre-requisite for writing.
(I can’t emphasise this enough.)

After reading this story, put it aside and ask your child simple questions like:

With whom was the pig doing a jig?
Do you think Bill the Chimp likes coconut milk?
Would you like to swim with a school of fish?
What do you think is in the bin that Jim is going to hit with a tin?
What is a mother goat called?
What plants do we have in our garden? (go and have a look)
What insects could we find in our garden?
Do we have birds visit our garden?


19. Let’s go on a treasure hunt:
A fun way to practise the ‘look-say’ words which appear in this booklet is to play this game with your child.
You say a word and see how quickly your child can find that word in the booklet.
To start with turn to a specific page of the booklet so your child knows the word will be on that page.
As your child gains confidence and easily recognises the words, you could use the whole booklet for a challenge.

It is essential to keep the game ‘moving’ and make it enjoyable for the child – work at his/her level – not too many words at first – find the same word on a different page - confidence comes with success.

NB: a ‘look-say’ word is a word that cannot be sounded out e.g. what, do, you, with, make, who.
When reading the child uses the ‘sense of the sentence’ to help him/her read ‘look-say’ words.
He, she, the, to are also look-say words but are usually easily added to the child’s reading vocabulary because they appear so often in the text.

As well as sounding out the three letter words that can be sounded out, encourage her/him to sound out the four letter words that can be sounded out.eg hits, swims, twig, spill, fins.


tutor notes for reading book comprehension
Tutor Notes for 'What do you think?' - page six

Print above image and use with the 'What do you think?' - pages 1 and 2 - and the Tutor Notes - pages 1 - 5.

Printing Instructions

A beneficial exercise for your child:
a. Print off a spare booklet.
b. Cut the sentences from each page and put them in random order.
c. Encourage your child to match each sentence to the sentence which is the same in the booklet he/she has made.
d. Read the sentence.

When your child is competent with this exercise:
a. Take the sentences, one at a time.
b. Cut them into words.
c. Put the words in jumbled order.
d. Encourage your child to rearrange the words into a sentence.
e. Read the sentence.
NB: If your child needs help, let her/him refer to the little booklet.
It’s good when your child can do this without referring to the booklet.
It’s a sign that she/he is actually reading the words.



21. Integrate with Maths (counting and numbering the pages in the booklet, fitting the drawing of a face into the size of the picture frame),
Punctuation (discussing the (?) at the end of a question, observe that sentences begin with a capital letter),
Art (drawing picture of self, completing pictures).

Enjoy










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This Anzac Day Project provides the opportunity for learning activities designed to help students understand that events and practices of the past have shaped our culture and democratic values, and that celebrating specific events is important to our sense of unity and belonging. Students will be encouraged to be active citizens and make a positive contribution to society. Students will realize that people’s past experiences may influence how they view a particular place. Students will investigate a historical event in order to understand the people, ideas and events that have helped to shape our nation.

This activity integrates Reading with Society and Environment, Mathematics and Art, and it can easily be integrated into your English programme.



Anzac Wreath activity sheet
Anzac Day - a Wreath - Activity Sheet

Print the above image and use it with the Anzac Day Reading Sheet, the Tutor Notes and the two sheets of photos.

Printing Instructions


Anzac Day Reading Notes
Anzac Day Reading Sheet

Print the above image and use it with the Anzac Day Wreath Activity Sheet, the Tutor Notes and the two sheets of photos.

Printing Instructions

Anzac Day

April 25th is Anzac Day.

On April 25th every year Australians remember the brave men and women who have died while serving Australia during wars, conflicts and peace keeping operations in which Australia has been involved.

We honour these men and women for their courage and sacrifice, and we pledge ourselves to work for peace. By pausing to honour the memory of our Service men and women, we are reminded how futile and terrible war is and how much better it would be if nations talked to each other to resolve their differences.
April 25th has become a special day in Australia because on that day in 1915 Australian and New Zealand soldiers landed on a beach in Gallipoli, with the aim of climbing the hills and driving back the enemy.
They eventually hoped to capture all of the Gallipoli Peninsula.
The soldiers didn’t know the enemy had found out they were coming and, on that day, hundreds of the soldiers were killed.
In spite of the heavy gun fire the soldiers bravely fought on and won a narrow strip of land.
After eight months and after thousands more soldiers had been killed, Gallipoli was evacuated, but the bravery, courage, mateship and heroism displayed by the troops led to the 25th April becoming a special day, and Anzac Day developing into the national memorial day it is today.

The name ANZAC is formed from the words

Australian
New
Zealand
Army
Corps.

Nearly every town in Australia has a War Memorial.
On Anzac Day memorial services are held, and wreaths are laid at these War Memorials, in memory of all Australian men and women who have served their country in war, conflicts and peace keeping operations.



Anzac Day Teaching Notes
Anzac Day Tutor Notes - page 1 of 3

Print the above image and use it with the Anzac Day Reading Sheet, the Anzac Day Wreath Activity Sheet, the Tutor Notes (pages 2 and 3) and the two sheets of photos.

Printing Instructions

Tutor Notes for Anzac Day:

This Anzac Day Project provides the opportunity for learning activities designed to help students understand that events and practices of the past have shaped our culture and democratic values, and that celebrating specific events is important to our sense of unity and belonging. Students will be encouraged to be active citizens and make a positive contribution to society. Students will realize that people’s past experiences may influence how they view a particular place. Students will investigate a historical event in order to understand the people, ideas and events that have helped to shape our nation.

This activity integrates Reading with Society and Environment, Mathematics and Art.
It can easily be integrated into your English programme.

SOCIETY AND ENVIRONMENT
Culture and Identity:
• that Australians consider specific days and symbols as important (Anzac Day)
• to gather cultural information using stories (from papers, books, internet, photos)
Place and Space:
• that the surface of the Earth consists of land masses and bodies of water
• ways a nation’s past experiences may influence how we view a particular place.
(War Memorials, Anzac Cove, Lone Pine.)
• caring for War Memorials
• locating places on a map – using an atlas/globe/map of the world.
(Gallipoli, Anzac Cove, Australia, New Zealand)
Time, Continuity and Change:
• that valued aspects of times past are preserved for the future
• ANZAC Day symbols and traditions, representing an Australian national identity
• that some people and events are considered more important than others in historical stories (eg ANZAC Day commemorations, ‘Diggers’)
• how to use specific history language and terms to describe people, events and ideas from the past.
• ways to connect the past with themselves and the world today
• how to make simple literal interpretations from a range of historical sources (photographs)
Active Citizenship:
• helping to look after the local War Memorial (if this can be arranged in your circumstance)
• demonstrate active citizenship through participation in and behaviour at school ANZAC Day commemorations.


Anzac Day Teaching Notes
Anzac Day Tutor Notes - page 2 of 3

Print the above image and use it with the Anzac Day Reading Sheet, the Anzac Day Wreath Activity Sheet, the Tutor Notes (pages 1 and 3) and the two sheets of photos.

Printing Instructions

English:
Speaking and Listening:
• In class/small groups express opinion and listen to opinions of others.
• strategies for cooperative learning (sharing ideas, listening to others.)
Viewing: Informative
• local and other newspaper articles and pictures/photos
• books/articles/pictures from the school library
• atlas, maps and globe of the world
• photos from home
Reading:
• reading Anzac Day reading sheet (provided above)
• local newspaper articles, pictures and photos
• books and articles from the school library
• word bank of ANZAC Day words
• information books may have features such as content, index,
bibliography, glossary, heading, sub-heading, captions, photos,
diagrams, maps.
• scanning for information
Writing:
• a letter home from the trenches
• create a poem, using Anzac Day as the theme
• message card for wreath
• write a soldier’s diary
• non-fiction about Anzac Day – write a story about a soldier at war

Mathematics:
Working Mathematically:
• using appropriate vocabulary
• using calendar to find 25th April

Art:
• deciding on suitable colours and design for the flowers on the wreath
• combining felt pen and colouring in pencils to create a stunning effect



Anzac Day Teaching Notes
Anzac Day Tutor Notes - page 3 of 3

Print the above image and use it with the Anzac Day Reading Sheet, the Anzac Day Wreath Activity Sheet, the Tutor Notes (pages 1 and 2) and the two sheets of photos.

Printing Instructions

Materials needed:

Anzac Day reading sheet (one for each child)
Wreath activity sheet (one for each child)
photos and/or pictures suitable to spark class discussion about Anzac Day
photos and/or pictures suitable to spark class discussion about Wreaths
coloured pencils
felt pens
an Atlas for each child

I suggest this lesson could be developed in the following order:

1. Take the class calendar and ask a child to find and mark April 25th.
Ask (brainstorm) the child/ren to find out how much they already know/understand about Anzac Day.
2. Give each child the Anzac Day reading sheet. Ask the child/ren to read it through with you.
3. Use the pictures you have collected to spark a class discussion about Anzac Day.
Important: Research this topic so you have the points you wish to cover to give the children knowledge and understanding about this special day.
4. A beneficial exercise is for each child to have an atlas so she/he can find Anzac Cove on a map of the world to show where this event took place and to show how far the soldiers were away from home.
5. Talk about wreaths and why we lay them at War Memorials on Anzac Day.
Photos and/or pictures of wreaths showing different colours, flowers and shapes would be helpful.
6. Give each child the Wreath activity sheet. Discuss the shape of the wreath and the flower used to create it.
Discuss the design of this wreath. Ask each child to think about the colours he/she will use to create her/his wreath. Talk about pattern and design.
Are all the roses going to be one colour?
Or is he/she going to use two or three different colours to make a pattern?

Hint: The roses look specky if a felt pen is used to outline the petals and trace over the lines in the petals of each rose - then colour the petals carefully, using colouring in pencils.
Outline the leaves and stems (on the black lines) with green felt pen and then colour in with green pencil.
Use the same technique for the letters that make up the words –
ANZAC DAY.

This exercise helps to teach children that effort = improved results.

Note: The completed wreaths make a stunning classroom display when pinned on the pin up board.

NB: After much discussion this topic (depending on the maturity of your class) can be used to motivate
children to write:
Non-Fiction about Anzac Day – why we commemorate it – what it
means to them.
Fiction – write a story about a soldier at war
write a soldier’s diary
create a poem using Anzac Day as the theme
write a soldier’s letter home to parents/spouse/children
message card for the wreath
These pieces of writing could be read at a School Assembly.

Excursion: Visiting the local War Memorial is a beneficial excursion for the child/ren in your care.





photos Gallipoli Anzac Cove
Photos of Gallipoli - Anzac Cove - page 1 of 2

Print the above image and use it with the Anzac Day Reading Sheet, the Anzac Day Wreath Activity Sheet, the Tutor Notes and sheet 2 of the photos.

Printing Instructions

photos Gallipoli Anzac Cove
Photos of Gallipoli - Anzac Cove - page 2 of 2

Print the above image and use it with the Anzac Day Reading Sheet, the Anzac Day Wreath Activity Sheet, the Tutor Notes and the first sheet of photos.

Printing Instructions
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Naplan Lessons

April 1st 2013 12:45
Naplan Test lessons


Naplan Test lessons


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