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Welcome to Phonics.net.au

This website offers a free, comprehensive and sequential phonic program for teaching children how to read. It is split into eight sections (including Phonic Packs) which are designed to be completed in order, however, each lesson is self contained and it's possible to pick and choose.

Each section is written so the lessons/activities can be stapled together to make a student booklet. Each section comes with detailed Tutor Notes.
To access each section click below.

You may also find the following posts useful in making the most of this Phonic program.


Why Teach Phonics?
What is in each Phonic Pack?
Lesson Schedules

You can also access types of lessons such as Single Sounds or Digraphs by scrolling down the menu on the left.

Continue reading to find out more about this program.



My name is Glenys Deutscher.

I am a school teacher with 37 years experience and over the years it has been my privilege to teach all Primary School Year Levels, from Kindergarten to Year 7.

I have been inspired to write these Phonic Books because I believe that systematic phonic instruction is the most successful way to teach children how to read and spell. Once children learn the sound for each letter of the alphabet, and can sound out three letter words, a whole new world of reading is opened up for them. Their confidence grows as they realise they can read and they soon learn to sound out longer words. The ability to read words fluently and with confidence improves reading comprehension. I have taught Year One children for many years and am convinced that a systematic phonic based programme enhances children’s reading progress. Each year I taught Year One, I had children who were non readers at the beginning of the year, progress to a reading age of over 8 years. Similar progress can also be tracked with Year 2 and Year 3 children whom I have taught with the phonic based programme. I have also used this programme to help older children who have been struggling with reading, with beneficial results.

I have written these Phonic Packs for parents (or other care givers) to work with a child because I am convinced there are many advantages for both child and parent to work through the programme together. Each year I have worked with many supportive parents whose positive input has improved their children’s learning.

Teachers and tutors will also find the lessons invaluable as they progressively and systematically work through a direct phonic programme. These lessons are sequential, so moving progressively through the phonic books could be your phonic programme (already written for you). However, each lesson stands alone, so if you do not want to move through the programme lesson by lesson you can choose which lessons are applicable to your classroom/teaching situation. Feel free to cut and paste.

Children not only need to learn how to read, they also need to be able to comprehend what they are reading. I have included a simple comprehension exercise at the end of each lesson to encourage the development of comprehension skills.

To be a fluent reader children also need to be able to confidently recognise common sight (look-say) words, so lessons introducing appropriate sight words are included in the Phonic Packs.

To help develop children's writing skills I have integrated simple punctuation exercises in to the Phonic Packs, and lessons encouraging the correct spelling of common words are included in Phonic Packs 5 and 6.

To encourage children to spell words correctly when they are writing, and to help children develop good dictionary skills, I have included a simple personal dictionary, which should be used when a child's writing skills develop to the stage where he/she is writing simple sentences.

To access the complete Phonic Packs click on the links in the menu to the left.

If you are searching for a specific type of activity (eg digraphs, reading sheets, initial sounds) scroll down the categories which can also be found (near the top) to the left. Some of the lessons in these categories are extension lessons which integrate reading with other learning areas and do not appear in the Phonic Packs eg Christmas, Easter, Writing Activities.

It is so important for children to be confident readers. It is my desire that this programme will help parents/teachers/tutors to empower children to achieve this goal.


If you have any questions please leave a comment on the questions page.


Happy reading,
Glenys Deutscher.

A number of people have enquired about ordering a hard copy of the phonic packs to save on printing costs and time.
To place an order:
1. Select your Phonic Pack
2. Click on the button below.


Select Your Phonic Pack:



NB: The following posts are the latest lessons/activities I have added to phonics.net.au. To access whole Phonic Packs click on the appropriate 'cover page' picture at the beginning of this site. For specific categories, click on the appropriate category/ies to the (top) left of this site.

I will be out of the office from 23rd June to 4th August. Any Phonic Pack orders received during these dates will be posted ASAP after 4th August.


silent 'h' as in ghost rhyme hour
Phonic Book Eight - Lesson 4 - Page 1 of 2 - Silent 'h' as in ghost and rhyme and hour

Print the above image and use with page 2 - Lesson 4.

Printing Instructions

Lesson Four: Silent ‘h’ as in ghost and rhyme and hour

1. Read all the silent ‘h’ words you wrote on page 11.
2. Here are some more silent ‘h’ words.
Read them and discuss the meaning of each one with your tutor.

honesty scheme ghetto honours honourable

3. Look at the table below.
Read the words and discuss with your teacher how the words have been
categorised.

4. Using the same categorisation, add the above words to the table.

5. Write the word ‘Rhodes’ in the correct column in the table.

silent h as in rhyme

rhyme
rhubarb
rhinoceros
rhythm


6. Pick up a red pencil and trace over the silent ‘h’ in each word.

7. Read all of your silent ‘h’ words.


phonic lessons teaching reading
Phonic Book Eight - Lesson 4 - Page 2 of 2 - Silent 'h' as in ghost and rhyme and hour

Print the above image and use with page 1 - Lesson 4.

Printing Instructions




NB: The Tutor Notes for Lesson Four are to be found with the Tutor Notes for Lesson Three.

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silent 'h' as in ghost rhyme hour
Phonic Book Eight - Lesson 3 - Page 1 of 3 - Silent 'h' as in ghost and rhyme and hour

Print the above image and use with pages 2 and 3 in Lesson 3.

Printing Instructions

Lesson Three: Silent ‘h’ as in ghost and rhyme and hour
1. Do you know what a ghost gum looks like?
2. Do you know what a ghost moth looks like?
3. Do you know what a ghost town is?
----------------------------- ----------------------------- -----------
A Group of Ghastly Ghosts
Once upon a time, a long way from anywhere, the Rhodes family lived on a farm called Rhodes Ranch. The Rhodes family worked hard and in a few years they bought the farm next door and moved into the big house on the new farm. The house and buildings on Rhodes Ranch were abandoned.

In time the abandoned buildings were inhabited by a group of ghastly ghosts.
At first there were three ghastly ghosts,
then five,
then nine
and then ten.
What a happy group of ghastly ghosts they were, occupying the abandoned buildings a long way from anywhere.
----------------------------- ----------------------------- -----------------

4. Turn to page 10 and find the ten ghastly ghosts that occupy the abandoned
buildings on Rhodes Ranch.
5. Read the word on each ghastly ghost and discuss its meaning with your tutor.

silent 'h' as in ghost rhyme hour
Phonic Book Eight - Lesson 3 - Page 2 of 3 - Silent 'h' as in ghost and rhyme and hour

Print the above image and use with pages 1 and 3 in Lesson 3.

Printing Instructions

silent 'h' as in ghost rhyme hour
Phonic Book Eight - Lesson 3 - Page 3 of 3 - Silent 'h' as in ghost and rhyme and hour

Print the above image and use with pages 1 and 2 in Lesson 3.

Printing Instructions

6. Three ghastly ghosts occupy the abandoned house.
Write their words on the following lines.

What do you notice is the same in these three words?
----------------------------- -----

7. Two ghastly ghosts occupy the abandoned shed.
Write their words on the following lines.

What do you notice is the same in these two words?
----------------------------- ----------------
8. Four ghastly ghosts occupy the trees by the abandoned buildings.
Write their words on the following lines.

What do you notice is the same in these four words?
----------------------------- ----------------------------- -----------------------
9. One ghastly ghost occupies the abandoned hut.
Write its word on the line.

10. Pick up a red pencil and trace over the silent ‘h’ in each ghost word.




phonic lessons teaching reading
Phonic Book Eight - Tutor Notes for Lessons Three and Four

Print the above image and use as Tutor Notes for Lesson 3.

Printing Instructions



Tutor Notes for Lesson Three - Phonic Book Eight

Lesson Three: silent ‘h’ as in ghost, rhyme and hour

Lesson Three aims to introduce silent ‘h’ words in an interesting way.

Before the lesson begins I suggest you research and find information about, and pictures of, ‘ghost gums’, ‘ghost moths’ and ‘ghost towns’.
This information is readily available on the internet.
The pictures and information will expand the children’s knowledge of these topics and will also create an opportunity for discussion.

Note: Class/group discussions are a very important part of a child’s development :
• they give the child the opportunity to practise the important skill of being able to express oneself orally.
• being able to order ones thoughts and express oneself orally and confidently is a pre-requisite to being able to write well.
• they give the child the opportunity to speak in front of other people and hopefully develop confidence with this skill.
• they give the child practise at listening to other people and their opinions.

These discussions will lead to the reading of the short story ‘A Group of Ghastly Ghosts’.

Reading this story could led into a short discussion about living in remote areas.

Page 9 No 5: It is always very important for children to correctly pronounce and know the meaning of each word being studied. They are more likely to remember it next time they read it and more likely to use it in their everyday vocabulary and writing.

Page 10: If time allows, the children would enjoy colouring in the grass and bushes and perhaps the sky in this picture. It would give them a sense of ownership and would give you time to help any individual children who may need extra help.
HINT: for best results instruct the children to use coloured pencils
(not felt pens).

Page 11: Is mainly about the silent h words but also, for fun, has two ghost riddles on it. (read the ghosts’ speech bubbles)
Children love riddles and you may wish to extend this activity into your writing programme by asking them to make up and write down some ghost riddles.
Each child could read out his/her riddle to the class to see if her/his peers can guess the answer.

WARNING: be prepared for some ‘corny’ riddles. Not all children at this stage of development understand what a riddle is all about – but I have found they find it a fun activity never-the-less.

There are a lot of ghost riddles on the internet for you to peruse.


Lesson Four: silent ‘h’ as in ghost, rhyme and hour

A second lesson consolidates facts introduced and learnt in the first.

Using categorisation and a bar graph integrates phonics learning with mathematics.





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Lesson Two - Phonic Pack 8 - 'ey' as in chimney and donkey and monkey

'ey' as in chimney, monkey, donkey
Phonic Book Eight - Lesson 2 - page 1 of 2 - 'ey' as in chimney and donkey and monkey

Print the above image- Page 1 of 2 - Lesson 2 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

Lesson Two: ‘ey’ as in chimney, donkey and monkey

1. Read the ‘ey’ as in chimney words you wrote on page 6.
2. Read the story ‘The Valley of Dreams’ and answer the following questions.
(a) During the journey, who missed out on a feed?

What do you think she ate on the journey?

(b) Why did the donkey groan, “Oh no,” when she saw the jersey cow?


3. Possessive Apostrophe:
Look at this phrase:
the jockey’s donkey
The apostrophe in jockey’s is called a possessive apostrophe.

Follow this pattern:
the donkey belongs to the jockey the jockey’s donkey
the tail belongs to the monkey
the glasses belong to the Grandma
the back belongs to the donkey


comprehension exercise
Phonic Book Eight - Lesson 2 - page 2 of 2 - 'ey' as in chimney and donkey and monkey

Print the above image- Page 2 of 2 - Lesson 2 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

4. Answer these riddles:
Riddle number one:
I have four wheels.
People like to shop with me.
Sometimes people have to pay to use me.
Sometimes children ride on me (even if they shouldn’t).
Sometimes small children ride in me (even if they shouldn’t).
People find me useful when they go shopping.
Shoppers put things in me.

I am a __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __

Riddle number two:
My first is in knee but not in no
My second is in their but not in there
My third is in hide and also in found
My fourth is in no and nil and nothing _
My fifth is in dear and also in deer
My last is in you but not in ewe

I am a __ __ __ __ __ __

Explain to your partner what you already know about the answer to this riddle.
Discuss with your teacher.



Tutor Notes to Accompany Lesson 2 - Phonic Book 8
comprehension possessive apostrophe
Tutor Notes to Accompany Lesson Two in Phonic Book 8

Print the above image - Tutor Notes to Accompany Lesson 2 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

Lesson Two: ‘ey’ as in chimney, donkey and monkey:

Page 7: No 2. is a comprehension activity.
Give the child time to reread the story and discover the answers for her/himself.
Let the child express the answers in his/her own words.
How she/he does this will tell you plenty about the child’s development and comprehension skills.
You may like to use this information in your records.

Page 7: No 3: Possessive Apostrophe:
This activity can be used to consolidate the child’s knowledge/understanding of possessive apostophes.
If the child doesn’t know/understand about possessive apostrophes I suggest you work the possessive apostrophe lessons which can be found in www.phonics.net.au . Scroll down the categories to the left of the top blog to the ‘Punctuation’ or ‘Naplan Test’ Categories. Explore these until you find the lessons on the possessive apostrophe.

Page 8: No 4: Children like the challenge of solving riddles.
NB: the answers to the riddles are both ‘ey’ words. (shopping trolley and kidney)
Do the children pick this up?

Extra Activities:
• Study the dialogue in the story and discuss the correct punctuation to use for dialogue.
The children could practise writing dialogue, concentrating on using the correct punctuation.

• Art Activity: ask the children to draw/paint the valley of dreams.

• Speaking and/or Writing Activity: ask the children to describe (orally and/or in writing) the valley of dreams.

• Make a plot profile.

This is a difficult (comprehension) activity when first encountered so if this is the first time the children have attempted it they will need lots of explanation and guidance to succeed.
Filling in the Plot Profile as a whole class activity is useful (modelling).

Making a profile of the plot of a story is making a sequential list of the main series of events or an outline of the action of the story.

To help the children do this I have prepared two Plot Profile sheets on the following pages.
I have made them general so you can use it for other stories.

• The Plot Profile using the Narrative Framework is suitable for short stories with no more than eight main interest events (including the beginning and ending events).

Using this Profile helps the children understand how a story has a beginning, a middle and an end. They can also see that the middle part of the story has several main interest events and this is where the story develops.

• Once the children understand how to construct a Plot Profile they may be comfortable with the second sheet. If there are more than 10 important events in a story another sheet of paper will be required.

• Transferring the information from a Plot Profile on to a graph shows the children how the author builds the excitement and/suspense as the story progresses.
Sometimes the excitement goes down a little but (hopefully) the line on the graph is always on an upward trend.

NB: Fill in the graph by putting a dot in each appropriate box and joining the dots with a line.




Plot Profiles and Graph
plot profile
Plot Profile

Print the above image to use as a Plot Profile.

Printing Instructions


comprehension plot profile
Plot Profile

Print the above image to use as a Plot Profile.

Printing Instructions

plot profile comprehension
Plot Profile Graph

Print the above image to use as a Plot Profile Graph.

Printing Instructions

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Lesson Two - Phonic Pack 8 - 'ey' as in chimney and donkey and monkey

'ey' as in chimney, monkey, donkey
Phonic Book Eight - Lesson 2 - page 1 of 2 - 'ey' as in chimney and donkey and monkey

Print the above image- Page 1 of 2 - Lesson 2 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

Lesson Two: ‘ey’ as in chimney, donkey and monkey

1. Read the ‘ey’ as in chimney words you wrote on page 6.
2. Read the story ‘The Valley of Dreams’ and answer the following questions.
(a) During the journey, who missed out on a feed?

What do you think she ate on the journey?

(b) Why did the donkey groan, “Oh no,” when she saw the jersey cow?


3. Possessive Apostrophe:
Look at this phrase:
the jockey’s donkey
The apostrophe in jockey’s is called a possessive apostrophe.

Follow this pattern:
the donkey belongs to the jockey the jockey’s donkey
the tail belongs to the monkey
the glasses belong to the Grandma
the back belongs to the donkey


comprehension exercise
Phonic Book Eight - Lesson 2 - page 2 of 2 - 'ey' as in chimney and donkey and monkey

Print the above image- Page 2 of 2 - Lesson 2 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

4. Answer these riddles:
Riddle number one:
I have four wheels.
People like to shop with me.
Sometimes people have to pay to use me.
Sometimes children ride on me (even if they shouldn’t).
Sometimes small children ride in me (even if they shouldn’t).
People find me useful when they go shopping.
Shoppers put things in me.

I am a __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __

Riddle number two:
My first is in knee but not in no
My second is in their but not in there
My third is in hide and also in found
My fourth is in no and nil and nothing _
My fifth is in dear and also in deer
My last is in you but not in ewe

I am a __ __ __ __ __ __

Explain to your partner what you already know about the answer to this riddle.
Discuss with your teacher.



Tutor Notes to Accompany Lesson 2 - Phonic Book 8
comprehension possessive apostrophe
Tutor Notes to Accompany Lesson Two in Phonic Book 8

Print the above image - Tutor Notes to Accompany Lesson 2 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

Lesson Two: ‘ey’ as in chimney, donkey and monkey:

Page 7: No 2. is a comprehension activity.
Give the child time to reread the story and discover the answers for her/himself.
Let the child express the answers in his/her own words.
How she/he does this will tell you plenty about the child’s development and comprehension skills.
You may like to use this information in your records.

Page 7: No 3: Possessive Apostrophe:
This activity can be used to consolidate the child’s knowledge/understanding of possessive apostophes.
If the child doesn’t know/understand about possessive apostrophes I suggest you work the possessive apostrophe lessons which can be found in www.phonics.net.au . Scroll down the categories to the left of the top blog to the ‘Punctuation’ or ‘Naplan Test’ Categories. Explore these until you find the lessons on the possessive apostrophe.

Page 8: No 4: Children like the challenge of solving riddles.
NB: the answers to the riddles are both ‘ey’ words. (shopping trolley and kidney)
Do the children pick this up?

Extra Activities:
• Study the dialogue in the story and discuss the correct punctuation to use for dialogue.
The children could practise writing dialogue, concentrating on using the correct punctuation.

• Art Activity: ask the children to draw/paint the valley of dreams.

• Speaking and/or Writing Activity: ask the children to describe (orally and/or in writing) the valley of dreams.

• Make a plot profile.

This is a difficult (comprehension) activity when first encountered so if this is the first time the children have attempted it they will need lots of explanation and guidance to succeed.
Filling in the Plot Profile as a whole class activity is useful (modelling).

Making a profile of the plot of a story is making a sequential list of the main series of events or an outline of the action of the story.

To help the children do this I have prepared two Plot Profile sheets on the following pages.
I have made them general so you can use it for other stories.

• The Plot Profile using the Narrative Framework is suitable for short stories with no more than eight main interest events (including the beginning and ending events).

Using this Profile helps the children understand how a story has a beginning, a middle and an end. They can also see that the middle part of the story has several main interest events and this is where the story develops.

• Once the children understand how to construct a Plot Profile they may be comfortable with the second sheet. If there are more than 10 important events in a story another sheet of paper will be required.

• Transferring the information from a Plot Profile on to a graph shows the children how the author builds the excitement and/suspense as the story progresses.
Sometimes the excitement goes down a little but (hopefully) the line on the graph is always on an upward trend.

NB: Fill in the graph by putting a dot in each appropriate box and joining the dots with a line.




Plot Profiles and Graph
plot profile
Plot Profile

Print the above image to use as a Plot Profile.

Printing Instructions


comprehension plot profile
Plot Profile

Print the above image to use as a Plot Profile.

Printing Instructions

plot profile comprehension
Plot Profile Graph

Print the above image to use as a Plot Profile Graph.

Printing Instructions

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phonic lessons teaching reading
Cover Page for Phonic Book Eight

Print the above image and use as the cover page for Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

phonic lessons teaching reading
Contents Page for Phonic Book Eight

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Printing Instructions

Lessons for Phonic Pack Eight

Lesson One ‘ey’ as in chimney and donkey and monkey pages 1 – 6
Lesson Two ‘ey’ as in chimney and donkey and monkey pages 7 8
Lesson Three Silent ‘h’ as in ghost and rhyme and hour pages 9 - 11
Lesson Four Silent ‘h’ as in ghost and rhyme and hour pages 12 13
Lesson Five ‘the’ as in breathe and bathe page 14
Lesson Six ‘the’ as in breathe and bathe pages 15 16
Lesson Seven ‘ain’ as in fountain pages 17 18
Lesson Eight ‘ain’ as in fountain page 19
Lesson Nine ‘eer’ as in deer and cheer and steer pages 20 21
Lesson Ten ‘eer’ as in deer and cheer and steer page 22
Extension Activity Treasure Hunt page 23
Lesson Eleven Silent ‘g’ as in gnome and gnat and gnaw pages 24 25
Lesson Twelve Silent ‘g’ as in gnome and gnat and gnaw page 26
Lesson Thirteen Silent‘t’ as in whistle and listen and often pages 27 – 29
Lesson 14 Silent‘t’ as in whistle and listen and often page 30
Lesson 15 Silent ‘l’ as in palm and half and salmon pages 31 – 33
Lesson 16 Silent ‘l’ as in palm and half and salmon pages 34 35
Lesson 17 Silent ‘c’ as in scissors and scene and muscle page 36
Lesson 18 Silent ‘c’ as in scissors and scene and muscle pages 37 – 39
Lists of words in Phonic Pack Eight pages 40 - 42





phonic story
Phonic Book Eight - Lesson 1 - page 1 of 6 - 'ey' as in chimney - 'The Valley of Dreams'

Print the above image- Page 1 of 6 - Lesson 1 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

Lesson One: ‘ey’ as in chimney, donkey and monkey
1. Read the story ‘The Valley of Dreams’.
----------------------------- ----------------------------- ----------
The Valley of Dreams
One fine spring morning a jockey put a bag of money into his pocket and set off on his donkey to find the valley of his dreams.
Now this jockey’s donkey was no ordinary donkey. She was big and strong, intelligent and loyal.
In his mind the jockey’s valley of dreams was green and lush and beautiful.
It _____________________________ _____________________________ ____.

Two days into his journey, the jockey and his donkey met a monkey.
Now this was no ordinary monkey.
This monkey had ears like _________ ______, a long, ________________ tail and feet the shape of _______________________. His fur was ______________ and his eyes were __________________.

Draw the not so ordinary monkey


phonic lessons teaching reading
Phonic Book Eight - Lesson 1 - page 2 of 6 - 'ey' as in chimney - 'The Valley of Dreams'

Print the above image- Page 2 of 6 - Lesson 1 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

“Where are you going?” the monkey asked.
“To find the valley of my dreams,” the jockey replied.
“Can I come with you?”
“What can you give me to pay for the ride?”
The monkey disappeared for a moment or two and came back carrying two banana and parsley buns.
The buns looked delicious and the jockey was hungry.
“Jump up,” he said.
So the monkey climbed onto the donkey’s back and off they went, enjoying the banana and parsley buns.

Four days into the journey the jockey, the monkey and the donkey met a turkey.
Now this turkey was no ordinary turkey.
This turkey had a big beak the shape of a ____________________________.
His tail was _______________________ and __________________________,
and his feet were _____________________________ __.


Draw the
not so ordinary
turkey


The turkey looked at the jockey and monkey.
“Where are you going?” he asked.
“To find the valley of my dreams,” the jockey replied.
“Can I come with you?”
“What can you give me to pay for the ride?”


phonic lessons teaching reading
Phonic Book Eight - Lesson 1 - page 3 of 6 - 'ey' as in chimney - 'The Valley of Dreams'

Print the above image- Page 3 of 6 - Lesson 1 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

The turkey disappeared into an alley for a moment or two and came back with three wheat sprout sandwiches.
The sandwiches looked delicious and the jockey was hungry. “Fly up,” he said.
So the turkey flew up onto the donkey’s back and off they went, enjoying the wheat sprout sandwiches.
Six days into the journey the jockey, the monkey, the turkey and the donkey met a bee.
Now this bee was no ordinary bee.
She had _______________ stripes across her back, her eyes ________________ and her wings _____________________________ ______.

Draw the not so ordinary bee.

The bee looked at the jockey, the monkey and the turkey.
“Where are you going?” she asked.
“To find the valley of my dreams,” the jockey replied.
“Can I come with you?”
“What can you give me to pay for the ride?”
The bee flew to an old chimney, which belonged to an old, crumbling house, and returned with four tiny pots of honey.
The tiny pots of honey looked delicious and the jockey was very hungry.
“Join us,” he said.
So the bee flew onto the donkey’s back and off they went, enjoying the tiny pots of honey.




phonic lessons teaching reading
'Phonic Book Eight - Lesson 1 - page 4 of 6 - 'ey' as in chimney - 'The Valley of Dreams

Print the above image- Page 4 of 6 - Lesson 1 - Phonic Book 8.

Printing Instructions

Eight days into the journey the jockey, the monkey, the turkey, the bee and the donkey met a jersey cow.
Now this jersey cow was definitely no ordinary jersey cow.
She was wearing glasses. Her horns _____________________________ ____
and her ears _____________________________ ______________.

Draw the not so
ordinary
jersey cow

The cow looked at the travellers.
“Where are you going?” she asked.
“Oh no!” groaned the donkey.
“To find the valley of my dreams,” the jockey replied.
“Oh,” said the cow. “I have the key to the gate which leads into the valley of your dreams.”
“Thank goodness,” thought the donkey.
“How can I get the key?” the jockey asked in an excited voice.
“You have to answer this riddle,” replied the cow handing the jockey a piece of paper. “Read the clues carefully and bring it back to me when you’ve solved the riddle.”
The jockey and his friends sat down together to solve the riddle.
(Of course the animals can’t solve the riddle without your help.)


phonic lessons teaching reading
Phonic Book Eight - Lesson 1 - page 5 of 6 - 'ey' as in chimney - 'The Valley of Dreams'

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Printing Instructions

The first is in dog, but not in log.

The second is in great, but not in gate.

The third is a double in feed and meet.

The fourth is the first letter of the alphabet.

The fifth is twice in Mum, but not in Dad.


The sixth is in long and in short.

The seventh is not in start, but is in finished.


The answer to the riddle is:


The jockey ran to the jersey cow with the answer.
He waited nervously as she checked each box.
“Congratulations!” she said. “Here is the key to the valley of your dreams.”

The donkey carried the four friends to the gate which led into the valley of dreams.
The jockey turned the key in the lock ……….,
the gate swung open ……………
and there was the valley of dreams!


phonic lessons teaching reading
Phonic Book Eight - Lesson 1 - page 6 of 6 - 'ey' as in chimney - 'The Valley of Dreams'

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Printing Instructions

2. Some of the words in this story are underlined. Write them on the following lines.
Write each word only once, even if it appears more than once in the story.
3. Read the words with a partner.
4. What sound do you hear in every word?
5. Trace over the letters in each word which are making this sound.
6. Discuss the meaning of each word with your tutor.


Tutor Notes for Lesson 1 - Phonic Book 8:
phonic lessons teaching reading
Tutor Notes to Accompany Lessons in Phonic Book 8 - Introduction - Page 1

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Printing Instructions

Notes for Tutor:
The activities in Phonic Pack 8 can be integrated into the Reading for a Purpose, Writing, Mathematics, Art and Craft, Spelling, Word Building, using a dictionary, Writing a Narrative and Contractions.

When a child reaches this stage in his/her reading development these phonic lessons are not so much about adding all the given words to his/her reading vocabulary, as many of the children will be confidently reading some of the words already. The lessons aim to consolidate what he/she knows and to introduce new words.
Each child will be learning at his/her own pace, picking up new words from each activity.
This will be different for each child.
Discussing the meaning of each word should add newly encountered words to the child’s reading, speaking and writing vocabularies.

The activities:
• consolidate words they know (may be different for each child)
• introduce words they have not encountered before (may be different for each child)
• clarify the meaning of each word (most important)
• encourage correct spelling of the word in future writing
• introduces word building - the pathway to new words and correct spelling
• allows each child’s reading, writing and speaking vocabularies to be extended from his/her own level of development/achievement.
• encourage writing sentences with the correct punctuation.
• give practise at reading, understanding and following instructions.
• encourage consolidation and extension of comprehension skills.
• give the children invaluable practise at ordering their thoughts/ideas into a cohesive sentence/story/presentation. (very important skill to master)

Extra Beneficial Activities which can easily and quickly be incorporated with these lessons are:
• word building – eg adding an ‘s’, ‘ed’, ‘ing’, as appropriate, to the words being covered.
• directing the children’s attention to possessive apostrophes when encountered in the text.
• always insist on neat work.
I believe (from my many years of practical experience) that if a child is putting effort into presentation it improves the learning outcomes for that child.
• consolidate the understanding and use of contractions.
• every time a sentence or story has quotation (speech) marks use the opportunity to discuss them.

Note: Children will need a dictionary to work some of the activities in this booklet.

Give the children the opportunity to colour in the picture on the cover of Phonic Pack Eight.
A smart finish is to carefully trace over the outline (of the part of the picture to be coloured in) with felt pen and then colour it in with coloured pencil.

phonic lessons teaching reading
Tutor Notes to Accompany Lessons in Phonic Book 8 - Lesson One - Page 2

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Printing Instructions

Lessons One – ‘ey’ as in chimney, donkey and monkey

Throughout the story ‘The Valley of Dreams’ there are activities which will challenge the reader.

These activities aim to extend the child’s imagination and comprehension skills in a fun way.

You know the development of the child/ren in your class.
After a general introduction and explanation of what is required:
• can he/she read and complete the activities with no help?
• can he/she read and complete the activities with minimal help?
• or will he/she need continual encouragement and help to successfully complete the given tasks.

The child/ren will need time to complete the pictures.
Think about using more than one lesson to complete the story if you know the child/ren need it.

You may think it beneficial to discuss each activity with the child/ren as it presents itself.
Ask the child/ren to give you ideas for completing the sentences and make a bank of words on the white/blackboard or chart from which the child/ren can choose if she/he wishes.

Keep the activities enjoyable and fun – give as much help as the child needs to succeed.

Page 6: No 2. Give the child/ren time to discover the answers.
Give help only as needed.

Writing each word encourages learning how to spell the words correctly.
It’s important for the child/ren to know the meaning of each word. It helps to expand the child’s
reading, writing and speaking vocabularies.
Being able to orally express the meaning of each word is a skill which is developed with practise.



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The following Tutor Notes are to be used in conjunction with the Lessons and other material in Phonic Pack Eight.
I have written the Tutor Notes to give an overall view of the activities in this Pack and this Phonic Programme as a whole.

Time in the classroom is short and my aim is to make a sequential Phonic Programme (from Pre-Reading through all the Phonic Packs) which can be easily followed with minimal preparation time required by the teacher.

Use of these notes should maximise the benefits to be gained from this programme.

Happy Reading.


tutor notes phonic lessons teaching
The Cover Page for 'Notes For Tutors ** Phonic Pack 8

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Printing Instructions


tutor notes phonic lessons teaching
Tutor Notes for Phonic Pack 8 - Page 1 of 6

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Printing Instructions

This Pack follows Phonic Packs One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six and Seven:

• Phonic Pack One introduces the single sounds (a-z), sounding out two and three letter words and listening for beginning, middle and end sounds. Phonic Pack One also covers writing the correct letter formation for each capital and lower case letter of the alphabet and writing two and three letter words.

• Phonic Pack Two consists of 53 lessons. It covers double letters, initial and final blends and 6 digraphs (ck, th, wh, ch, sh and ee.) It also covers ‘e’ as in me, ‘y’ as in sky, ‘ing’ as in ring, ‘old’ as in gold, ‘all’ as in ball and ‘y’ as in teddy.
Several common sight words and phrases are also introduced in this Pack.

• Phonic Pack Three covers digraphs ar, ai, oa, ea, ow (cow), ur, ay, ir, and oo (moon). It also covers i-e, a-e, o-e and u-e. Days of the week, colour words and number words, one to ten, are also introduced in this Pack. A comprehension activity follows the introduction of every sound because it is important that children comprehend what they read. Writing sentences with a capital letter and a full stop is also emphasised in this Phonic Pack.

Phonic Pack Four consists of 42 lessons which cover the digraphs er, or, oo (book), oy, ou, ow (bow), aw, ie, oi, oe and ew. It also covers the endings ple, tle, gle and ble. The sight (look-say) words was, off, of, are, have, after, over, were, you, here, hear, because and people, are also looked at in this Pack.
A comprehension activity is included in every lesson because it is important that children comprehend what they read. Writing correct sentences with correct punctuation is also covered.

Phonic Pack Five consists of 24 lessons. The first six lessons cover some commonly used words which children should be able to confidently spell at this stage of development. It also covers i (blind), wa (swan), a (father), o (glove), ce (face), o (pony), g (cage), alk (chalk). Lesson 16 compares son/sun, won/one, some/sum and sponge/sponge. Lessons 21 and 22 use the story, ‘Mo, The Lost Monkey’, to cover and compare “o,o,o,o,ow and o-e”. Comprehension exercises are included with the introduction of each sound. Extension exercises are suggested if the tutor would like to integrate the lessons into other learning areas.

• Phonic Pack Six consists of two books, Part One and Part Two.

Part One contains fourteen spelling lessons. These lessons revise the commonly used words introduced in Phonic Pack 5 and introduce more commonly used words which the children should be able to spell at this level of development.

Part Two consists of twenty four lessons. These lessons cover dge (bridge), tch (match), ear (ear), ea (bread), i (taxi), air (chair), are (square), ear (bear), igh (light) and au (haunted saucer).
Lesson 16 uses the story, ‘Grandad Gare’ to cover and compare ‘air’ (chair), ‘are’ (square) and ‘ear’ (bear).
Comprehension exercises and/or word studies are included in each lesson.
Extension exercises are suggested if the tutor would like to integrate the lessons into other learning areas.


tutor notes phonic lessons teaching
Tutor Notes for Phonic Pack 8 - Page 2 of 6

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Printing Instructions

• Phonic Pack 7 consists of 26 lessons. It has been written for children who are already competent readers, therefore no flash cards have been included. Lists of words covered for each sound have been included at the end of Phonic Book 7 for practise, revision and reference for correct spelling during writing activities. Children benefit from studying a sound in isolation and then in context.
The first six lessons concentrate on Alphabetical Order. Children need to understand and be confident using Alphabetical Order – it is a necessary ‘everyday life skill’.
The other twenty lessons cover ‘u’ as in push and pull, ‘ch’ as in orchids, ‘ph’ as in elephant, ‘wor’ as in worm, ‘ear’ as in pearl, silent ‘b’, silent ‘w’ and silent ‘k’.
A story entitled ‘The Purple Turtle Pet Shop’ has been included to cover and compare ‘ir’, ‘ur’, ‘er’, ‘wor’ and ‘ear’ as in pearl.
Comprehension exercises and/or word studies have been included in each lesson.
Extension exercises have been suggested to extend the brighter child and/or to integrate the learning into other learning areas.

• Phonic Pack 8: consists of 18 lessons. It has been written for children who are already competent readers, therefore no flash cards have been included. Lists of words covered for each sound have been included at the end of Phonic Book 8 for practise, revision and reference for correct spelling during writing activities. Children benefit from studying a sound in isolation and then in context.
Activities are included so children receive practise at writing the words which encourages improved reading, spelling and writing outcomes. Comprehension exercises are included. It is so important that children understand what they read. The lessons cover ‘ey’ as in chimney, silent ‘h’ as in ghost,
‘the’ as in breathe, ‘ain’ as in fountain, ‘eer’ as in deer, silent ‘g’ as in gnome, silent ‘t’ as in whistle, silent ‘l’ as in palm and silent ‘c’ as in scissors.
----------------------------- ----------------------------- ----------------------------- ------------------
* These Phonic Packs can be used by the classroom teacher as her/his phonic programme. You will be the best person to decide each child’s development and at what point he/she should enter this phonic programme. As the programme is divided into Packs, which together make up a progressive programme, you could have more than one group in your class working according to levels of development.

* If you are a parent/caregiver working through this Phonic Pack it will compliment your child’s school reading, writing and spelling programme.

* It is important for you to read through and be well prepared for each lesson before working through it with your child. Your child will benefit more from the lesson if you know what that particular lesson is aiming to teach your child, and you are confident with presentation.

* Insist all children use correct letter formation and pencil hold when writing. Keep the ‘Alphabet Sheet’ handy for quick reference.

* It is beneficial to systematically revise the sounds taught and read the words/sentences covered in previous lessons.

A list of words for each sound covered is included at the back of Phonic Pack Eight for children to practise reading the words and to use as a reference during reading/writing activities.

eg fountain
captain
mountain
bargain




tutor notes phonic lessons teaching
Tutor Notes for Phonic Pack 8 - Page 3 of 6

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Printing Instructions

* Writing the list on a chart means it can be used more than once and can be used by the children as a reference during reading/writing activities.
New words can be added as they are discovered.

Games can be played with the lists:
a) Who can read the list quickly?
b) Who can read the list from the bottom to the top? or……

c) Children love playing this game:
A child secretly chooses one of the words on the list and whispers it to the teacher (or writes it on a piece of paper).
A child from the group/class is nominated to guess which word has been chosen.

Note: The child guessing which word has been chosen says,
‘Was it ‘fountain’?’

The reply will be, ‘Yes, it was ‘fountain’ ’ or ‘No, it was not ‘fountain’ ’.

If the child does not guess correctly another child is nominated to guess.

When a child guesses correctly he/she becomes the leader.

NB: It is a good idea for the teacher to choose the child who is to guess the secret word.
This ensures all children will have a turn.

It’s important for you to develop a routine for working through the lessons. If you are a parent/caregiver using this Pack one huge advantage is that the child will have one-to-one tutoring. It is important for the child to have your attention and guidance for each lesson.
It is important for the child to know you are positive, enthusiastic and happy to be committed to this programme.
Another huge advantage if this Pack is used as a Parent Phonic Pack is that your child can move through it at his/her own pace. It is important for your child to progress at a pace where she/he can understand and remember the work being covered.

* Be liberal with your encouragement. Praise the child and give reward stickers for genuine effort. The child is going to enjoy the learning more if he/she is succeeding.


tutor notes phonic lessons teaching
Tutor Notes for Phonic Pack 8 - Page 4 of 6

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Printing Instructions

About the lessons in Phonic Pack Eight:
* At the beginning of each lesson the child will write his/her name. . A space is also provided at the top of each lesson to write the date. eg.(**-**-‘**)
* Let the child read the instructions for each lesson but cheerfully give help if needed. Reading the instructions gives your child important, purposeful reading practise.
* When covering the new words for the lesson make sure the child knows the meaning of each word. Putting the words into a sentence is a good exercise. It is putting the word into context and giving your child practise at ordering his/her thoughts.
* Every time a child writes a sentence make sure it has the correct punctuation. But remember: it is not always easy for children to remember the correct punctuation when concentrating on creating a sentence or story. Be patient. If a child needs to correct punctuation (or spelling) let her/him go back and ‘edit’ the work. Explain this is what authors do.
* Every time a sentence or story has quotation (speech) marks use the opportunity to discuss them. Don’t interrupt the flow of the lesson - at the end of the lesson is a good time.
* You do not have to cover a whole lesson at each sitting. To be successful work at a comfortable pace for the child (or group). It is important for children to understand and be able to remember the work being covered.
* Give the child TIME to read the words and work the exercises. The more he/she works out for him/herself the more he/she will learn and remember.
* When working an activity let a child read and then work with only as much help as she/he needs to succeed. A child will remember better if he/she has worked the activity or exercise by him/herself.
* Work with a lead pencil, then mistakes can easily be erased and corrected. Always correct mistakes. Children will not get everything right all the time and will learn by correcting mistakes.
* When you dictate words for a child to write (after she/he has practised the words) let him/her write the word as he/she remembers it. Then get him/her to check it from the correct list - you do not check it, just supervise the process. If the word is spelt correctly let the child give it a tick. If the word is not spelt correctly ask the child to erase it and write it correctly. Take note of and come back another day to the words which need more time.
* Telling stories is an important exercise. It encourages a child to get his/her thoughts in order and to sort the events of the story into a logical sequence. The stories do not have to be long.
* At this stage of development children should be able to write confidently in sentences, using correct punctuation. However, when writing a story this skill is often lost in the energy needed to create the story. Writing freely first and then editing is a good way to go. Editing is not easy (and children are not usually too interested). You may decide not to edit every story written. A child will need lots of modelling and working together to master this skill. One day the story could be edited for spelling mistakes. Next lesson it could be edited for sentence punctuation – splitting it into a small/one task makes it easier. In a classroom situation it is often beneficial to work in pairs for this task.
* Every piece of work edited does not have to be written out into a perfect copy, but children should be encouraged to re-write a piece of work if it is to be ‘published’ (ie displayed). This encourages acceptable presentation and a pride in one’s work.
* Listening to and following instructions are two important skills to be practised.
* At the beginning of each lesson encourage the child to read the number of the lesson and the page number. This is invaluable practise at reading numbers and number sequence.
* We learn to read so we can read. It is important for a child to read his/her own books or books from the school or town library. I cannot emphasise this enough. It is important too, for you to read regularly to your child/ren.
* Looking at pages in books or papers and finding words with the sound being covered on that day is an excellent game to play with your child. New words can be added to the list/chart of words.
* ‘Word Hunt’ is another good game to play. Finding sight words in favourite books is beneficial for your child. (Remember it is a game – keep it fun)
* If you are not sure of the sound of a digraph (or other letters), say the word and listen for the sound.





tutor notes phonic lessons teaching
Tutor Notes for Phonic Pack 8 - Page 5 of 6

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Printing Instructions

* A child should be using the following strategies for reading unknown words:
1. Look at the beginning of the word – what sound does it begin with?
2. Use any picture clues that are available.
3. Sound the word out, if it is not a sight word.
4. Use the sense of the sentence or story. As pictures on a page become less this strategy becomes more important.
* Once a word has been covered in a lesson, (eg all the ‘eer’ words on page 20) encourage your child to always use the correct spelling in his/ her writing. Help your child look the word up in the list of words or a dictionary.
* At this stage of development, when writing, a child should be encouraged to use a junior dictionary to help her/him spell the more difficult words. Explain this is what adults do when they are not sure how to spell a word. Let your child see you using a dictionary.
* A home made dictionary is a good way to get a child used to finding words in alphabetical order, using the first letter only.
To help you make a personal dictionary for each child you will find the pages for ‘My Dictionary’ on my Phonic Blog (www.phonics.net.au). Look in the top blog underneath the titles for the Phonic Packs. Click on ‘My Dictionary’ and you will find the pages to print and staple together to make a personal dictionary.
Note: Some children may now be mature enough to use a (commercial) Junior Dictionary instead of ‘My Dictionary’ as suggested above. If a child understands alphabetical order and is familiar with using ‘My Dictionary’ he/she will find the transition to a commercial dictionary, where all the words are in alphabetical order, much easier than a child who has not had this practise.
Either way, the children will need practise at looking words up in a dictionary where they have to use alphabetical order. For the children who still find this process difficult postpone it until further development has taken place and, for now, let them continue to use ‘My Dictionary’.

Resources needed for Phonic Pack Eight:
Note: You may have some of these resources from previous Phonic Packs.

a scrap book for each child (at least 50 pages) -
glue the completed pages of Phonic Book 8 into this scrap book
coloured pencils eraser felt pens
lead pencils high lighter scissors
pencil sharpener glue stick reward stickers
dictionaries

Extra sheets of paper to write words/stories on.




tutor notes phonic lessons teaching
Tutor Notes for Phonic Pack 8 - Page 6 of 6

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Printing Instructions

Time to Celebrate


When Phonic Pack Eight is completed make sure there is a celebration.
(It doesn’t have to be elaborate or costly)

Each child will enjoy receiving the Honour Certificate.

A classroom teacher could organise:
(eg) a small cake for each child, make pancakes, extra time in the playground, is there a favourite game the children like playing, watch an educational DVD, visit the library for a special story …

Parents could:
(eg) buy an ice cream, go to the beach, visit the zoo, buy a book, buy a new toy, picnic in the park/playground …

Make sure each child knows the reward is because he/she worked so hard to complete Phonic Pack 8 and you are pleased with his/her progress.

As an incentive the reward could be declared at the beginning of Phonic Pack 8.
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Phonic Pack Eight - Phonics

June 10th 2014 08:56
Introducing Phonic Pack Eight

(Phonic Pack Eight is a work in progress.)

Phonic Pack 8 has been written for children who are already competent readers.The lessons are designed to further extend the child's reading vocabulary and independence. It consists of Eighteen Lessons accompanied by Tutor Notes and suggestions for integrating the lessons into other Learning Areas. Comprehension exercises which aim to expand the child's comprehension skills are included. Word studies and writing sentences with correct punctuation have also been included.

A complete hard copy of Phonic Pack Eight is available and can be ordered on www.phonics.net.au

phonic lessons teaching reading
Cover Page for Student's Phonic Book Eight


phonic lessons teaching reading
Contents Page for Phonic Book Eight


Peruse to review the sounds covered in Phonic Pack Eight.



Lessons for Phonic Pack Eight

Lesson One ‘ey’ as in chimney and donkey and monkey pages 1 – 6
Lesson Two ‘ey’ as in chimney and donkey and monkey pages 7 8
Lesson Three Silent ‘h’ as in ghost and rhyme and hour pages 9 - 11
Lesson Four Silent ‘h’ as in ghost and rhyme and hour pages 12 13
Lesson Five ‘the’ as in breathe and bathe page 14
Lesson Six ‘the’ as in breathe and bathe pages 15 16
Lesson Seven ‘ain’ as in fountain pages 17 18
Lesson Eight ‘ain’ as in fountain page 19
Lesson Nine ‘eer’ as in deer and cheer and steer pages 20 21
Lesson Ten ‘eer’ as in deer and cheer and steer page 22
Extension Activity Treasure Hunt page 23
Lesson Eleven Silent ‘g’ as in gnome and gnat and gnaw pages 24 25
Lesson Twelve Silent ‘g’ as in gnome and gnat and gnaw page 26
Lesson Thirteen Silent‘t’ as in whistle and listen and often pages 27 – 29
Lesson 14 Silent‘t’ as in whistle and listen and often page 30
Lesson 15 Silent ‘l’ as in palm and half and salmon pages 31 – 33
Lesson 16 Silent ‘l’ as in palm and half and salmon pages 34 35
Lesson 17 Silent ‘c’ as in scissors and scene page 36
Lesson 18 Silent ‘c’ as in scissors and scene pages 37 – 39 Lists of words in Phonic Pack Eight pages 40 - 42

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Western Australia Day


This activity :
• helps children understand why we celebrate Western Australia Day.
• integrates reading for a purpose with hand writing and writing.
• integrates into the Social Studies Learning Area
(History of WA, States and Capital Cities of Australia)
• encourages children to develop an interest in the history of their state.
• allows children to work at his/her own level of development
• encourages discussions about citizenship and how each one can
helpfully contribute to her/his community.


reading history western australia day
Western Australia Day - Reading Sheet One

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Printing Instructions

Western Australia Day
Western Australia Day is celebrated on the 1st June every year.

In 1829, after a long sea voyage from England, the barque ‘Parmelia’, under the command of Captain James Stirling, reached the coast of Western Australia.

Captain James Stirling had sailed to Western Australia with a group of free settlers. The purpose of this voyage was to establish the first European settlement in this state. They had left England in February and arrived in May. The journey took 112 days.

At first Captain James Stirling ruled the settlement as Lieutenant Governor but in November, 1831, he was appointed as the first Governor of Western Australia.

June the 1st was chosen to celebrate Western Australia Day because it was on this date in 1829 that the settlers on board the ‘Parmelia’ had their first view of Western Australia.

Before European settlement Aboriginal people had lived in Western Australia for thousands of years.

Since 1829 people from all over the world have come and settled in Western Australia and now it’s a modern multicultural society.

Western Australia Day provides all Western Australians with the opportunity to reflect on our state, its history and its future. We can all consider ways that each one of us can contribute to make this state a great place to live and work.


reading history western australia day
Western Australia Day - Reading Sheet Two


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Printing Instructions

Name:

Western Australia Day

On June 1st, 1829, Captain James Stirling arrived in Western Australia from

England.

He was on board the ship “Parmelia” with some settlers to form the first

European settlement in Western Australia.





writing history western australia day
Western Australia Day - Writing Activity Sheet One


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Printing Instructions


writing history western australia day
Western Australia Day - Writing Activity Sheet Two


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Printing Instructions



reading teaching
Tutor Notes for Western Australia Day


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Printing Instructions

Tutor Notes for Western Australia

This activity :
• helps children understand why we celebrate Western Australia Day.
• integrates reading for a purpose with hand writing and writing.
• integrates into the Social Studies Learning Area (history of WA, states,
capital cities of Australia)
• Encourages children to develop an interest in the history of their state.
• allows children to work at his/her own level of development
• encourages discussions about citizenship and how each one can
helpfully contribute to her/his community.

I have written two reading sheets.
Choose the one that is most suitable for the students in your class.

I have written two writing sheets.
Choose the one that is most suitable for the students in your class.
The second writing sheet is blank except for a map of WA.
This is to allow you and/or your students to discuss and decide what they will write.

NB: The completed sheets make an attractive classroom display.
They can also be read at your School Assembly.

Use the sheets as a springboard to discuss:
• the history of WA in more detail
• how the first European settlement coped with the harsh conditions in
WA
• how long the voyage from England took in those days
• the size and sea worthiness of the ships
• conditions on the ships
• why England was settling people in lands a long way from home
• why England was transporting convicts to Australia and other countries
• the impact this settlement had on the Aboriginal people
• when was the first Western Australia Day (Foundation Day it was called
then) celebrated
• why was the name changed from Foundation Day to Western Australia
Day
• I’m sure more points of interest will emerge as the discussions progress

NB: Details of this voyage, early European settlement and pictures of
Captain James Stirling can be found on the internet.
Do your homework before you introduce this lesson to your students.
The more informed you are the more fascinating and interesting you can
make the discussions.

After the reading of the sheet and the discussions that follow ask the children why they think WA is a good place to live. Then introduce the writing sheet and ask each child to write why she/he thinks WA is a good place to live. Each child can write at his/her own level of developmental.

Extension:
• why are there black swans on the reading sheet?
• label the other states of Australia
• label the capital city of each state
• have a map/globe of the world present so the children can find Australia
on it
• have a map/globe of the world present so the children can find England
on it
• trace the voyage from England to Australia on a map/globe of the world
• expand your discussions into projects about WA.
eg - Small groups could research wheat, wool, gold, iron ore, Argyle diamonds, pearling, fishing, early European settlements, Aboriginal studies, WA’s wildflowers, fauna (etc)

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ANZAC Day

April 7th 2014 09:00
anzac cove
Anzac Cove, getting ready for the 25th April dawn celebrations.


dawn service anzac cove
Dawn Service at Anzac Cove


Useful Information:

Each year I gather news items and photos about the ANZACS and pin them up in the classroom for observation and/or discussion. I keep the best clips in a folder so the information can be used for future studies about this important day in Australia's calendar.

the man with the donkey
John Simpson Kirkpatrick's Grave (the man with the donkey)


Lone Pine Gallipoli
Lone Pine, Gallipoli




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Anzac Biscuits

April 2nd 2014 08:25
To discover other ANZAC Day activities go to the left of the top blog and (under 'Phonic Packs') click on the category 'Anzac Day - Reading Activities.

Children love to cook and ANZAC biscuits are easy to make. This activity integrates reading into other Learning Areas:
reading for a purpose
a recipe - looking at the different forms of writing
cooking
science - changing from one state (raw) into another (cooked)
health and hygiene - washing hands before cooking, using clean utensils
safety first - handling things that are hot
writing - a letter to a soldier
handwriting - always neat with properly formed letters
reading and following instructions
mathematics - dividing the biscuits up evenly among class members


anzac biscuits cooking reading activity
ANZAC Biscuit Recipe


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Printing Instructions

ANZAC BISCUITS
We make ANZAC biscuits to help us celebrate ANZAC Day.
During World War 1 wives, relatives and friends sent ANZAC biscuits to soldiers serving overseas. This recipe was chosen because the biscuits kept well for quite a while and did not easily spoil while travelling to the soldiers.

Ingredients:

1 cup rolled oats
˝ cup sugar
1cup desiccated coconut
1 cup plain flour (sifted)
1 level teaspoon bicarb soda
2 tablespoons golden syrup
125gr butter
2 tablespoons water



Method:

1. Preheat oven to 150 degrees C
2. Grease the oven/ biscuit tray you are going to cook the biscuits on
or
line the tray with baking paper

3. Put the rolled oats, sugar, coconut and sifted flour into a basin and mix
well

4. Put the butter, water and golden syrup into a small saucepan and stir over
a low heat until the butter is fully melted
5. Remove from the heat and stir in the bicarb soda
6. Mix well

7. Pour into the dry ingredients and mix well until fully combined

8. Using a teaspoon, drop small pieces of mixture onto the oven/biscuit tray
9. Press down slightly with a fork
10. Bake in a moderate oven (150 degrees C) until golden brown.





anzac biscuits cooking reading activity teacher notes
Tutor Notes for ANZAC Biscuits


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Printing Instructions

ANZAC Biscuits - Notes for Tutor:

Before any cooking activity it is essential that you have your records up to date for any allergies the children in your class may have.
A note home to parents informing them of the cooking activity and the ingredients the children will be using and eating is a good idea – I consider it a must.
I get the note, giving permission for their child to be part in this cooking and eating activity, signed by the parents and returned to the school.

If your situation allows it, divide the class into two groups.
Have an adult (teacher assistant or parent) supervise the activity with the second group.
You will need the ingredients from one recipe for each group.

Each child is given a copy of the recipe.
Discuss how recipes are written.
How is it different to other forms of writing?
Read through the recipe with the children before you start the activity (this can be a whole class activity before you divide into groups)

Discuss with the children why you are making ANZAC biscuits.
Ideally this activity will follow other ANZAC Day discussions and activities so the children already understand why we celebrate ANZAC Day.

The children should wash their hands before handling food (integration into the Health Learning Area).

The ingredients can be brought to school in their packaging for the children to observe.

Read each step of the Method as you go.

Each child in the group should be given a turn to tip, measure or mix.

Measuring the ingredients is a practical activity which integrates into the Maths Learning Area.

Making children aware to be careful of the hot oven, oven/biscuit tray and even the biscuits when they are hot integrates this activity into the Health and Safety Learning area.

Observing the mixture as it changes while cooking integrates this activity into the Science Learning Area.

During all cooking activities the children are learning to share and wait for their turn.

Being well organised and having the lesson worked out step by step in your mind before you begin is essential for the smooth running and success of this activity.

When the biscuits are cooked and cooled they can be counted and divided evenly among the children (integration into the Maths Learning Area).

If the children are going to take any of the biscuits home to share with their families having enough foil for each child to wrap them in is a good idea.

Extension Activity:
Each child could imagine he/she is the parent of a soldier who is fighting at Gallipoli and she/he has made some ANZAC biscuits to send. Each child could write a letter to accompany the parcel of ANZAC biscuits.
The letters could be read at a school assembly.

Enjoy !!

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