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Initial, Final and Medial Sounds

May 24th 2007 09:41
Initial, Final and Medial Sounds
Initial, Final and Medial Sounds


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Printing Instructions



Initial, Final and Medial Sounds.


The next step:
Work through these stages at your child’s pace. Some children pick it up easily, others need more time.
Stage One: The first sound a child hears when sounding out a word is the beginning sound. During these lessons so far we have concentrated on the beginning (initial) sounds in words.

Check that your child can give you the sound a word begins with. It can be any word, not necessarily a three letter word.

Ask your child:
“What sound does the word ‘boat’ begin with?”
“What sound does (say child’s name) begin with?’
“What sound does the word ‘queen’ begin with?

Stage Two: When your child is confident with hearing and giving the initial sound in a word move on to the next step, which is identifying the final sound in a word.

Say to your child, ‘You are used to telling me the sound a word begins with, NOW I want you to listen for the LAST sound in the word.”

At first use three letter words your child is familiar with. e.g. bat, sun, lid, fox. Ask the child to watch your mouth as you say the word clearly. Emphasise the final sound until your child is confident with identifying it.


Practise with your child until he/she has mastered this skill. Frequent short sessions are better than long sessions.

If there are any letter-sounds your child cannot quickly say from the alphabet flashcards practise them every day.

Stage Three: Now that your child can identify the initial and final sounds in a word she/he can move on to listening for the middle sound in a word. To help this skill develop the five vowels –a,e,i,o,u- will be covered. Work at your child’s pace. Take one, two or more days to cover each section. Each section will include reading sentences and simple comprehension exercises.

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Medial Sound - a

May 24th 2007 09:55
I have posted a booklet, ‘Brat the Rat’, which emphasises the medial sound 'a'.
This booklet (written for emerging readers) can be found at the end of all the lessons and certificates for Phonic Pack 1.
Printing off and making this booklet with your child would be most beneficial at the end of the Lessons for medial sound 'a'.
Give your child as much help as needed to enjoy and successfully complete the booklet.




Medial sound - a - page 1
Medial Sound - a - (page 1)



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Printing Instructions


Medial Sound - a - page 1.


Medial sound ‘a’:
1. Look at these words. Read them.
(Tutor Note: your child may be able to read the words without sounding them out. This is good. If she/he cannot read a word without sounding it out, ask her/him to sound it out and then blend it into a word.)

cat rat mat fat bat hat

2. Circle the ‘a’ sound in each word. Notice it is the middle sound.

3. Sound out each word, listening for the ‘a’ sound.

4. Read this sentence.
Tutor Note: This is the process to follow when your child is reading sentences during the next few sessions.
• Your child reads as much of the sentence as he/she can, sounding out any unknown words which can be sounded out.
• Help your child with the look-say words. (e.g. The, the)
• If your child needed help or had to sound out words, ask him/her to read the sentence again, as fluently as possible, pointing to the words as she/he reads. This makes her/him look at the words, so he/she is reading them rather than saying them off by heart.
• Now that your child can read words it is important to string them together into sentences. This is how we read. Reading sentences and understanding what we read is also helping to develop reading comprehension skills. Drawing a picture about the sentence is a simple comprehension exercise.

Read and draw: The cat and the rat sat on the mat.



You can choose Foundation Print or Victorian Modern Cursive Print for this worksheet.

medial sound a page 1
Medial Sound - a - (page 2) - Foundation Print


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Printing Instructions


Medial Sound - a - page 2.


1. Look at these words. Read them.

(Tutor Note: instructions page 76)

ran man can van fan Dan pan

2. Circle the ‘a’ in each word.

3. Sound out each word, listening for the ‘a’ sound.

4. Read this sentence.

(Tutor Note: instructions page 76)


Read and draw: The man ran to the van.

Trace over each word and then write it neatly on the line.

Remember to hold your pencil correctly.

cat bat .

man tan .

jam ram

.
Medial sound - a - teaching phonics
Medial Sound - a - (page 2) - Victorian Modern Cursive Print

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Printing Instructions










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Medial Sound - e

May 24th 2007 11:36
Medial Sound - e
Medial Sound - e



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Printing Instructions


Medial Sound - e.


Medial sound ‘e’:

1. Look at these words. Read them.
(Tutor Note: instructions page 76 )

Ted led red bed fed wed

2. Circle the ‘e’ sound in each word. Is it the middle sound?

3. Sound out each word, listening for the ‘e’ sound.

4. Read this sentence, and then circle ‘Yes’ or ‘No’.

Tutor Note: follow the process for reading a sentence as explained in 4. page 65. Answering ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ to the sentence is encouraging the child to think about what he/she is reading and therefore developing important comprehension skills.

The bed is red. ‘Yes’ or ‘No’
----------------------------- ----------------------------- ---------------------

1. Look at these words. Read them.
Note: ‘ll’ = ‘l’

well bell tell yell sell fell

2. Circle the ‘e’ sound in each word.

3. Sound out each word, listening for the ‘e’ sound.

4. Read this sentence, and then circle ‘Yes’ or ‘No’

The bell fell in the well.
‘Yes or ‘No’

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Medial Sound - i

May 24th 2007 11:41
Medial Sound - i
Medial Sound - i



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Printing Instructions


Medial Sound - i.


Medial sound ‘i’:

1. Look at these words. Read them.

pig jig big dig fig wig

2. Circle the ‘i’ sound in each word.

3. Sound out each word, listening for the ‘i’ sound.

4. Read this sentence.

The pig in the wig did a jig.

5. Read and then answer this question by tracing over
yes or no .

Have you ever seen a pig in a wig doing a jig?

Tutor Note: Show your child the question mark at the end of the question. Explain to your child why it is there. Ask him/her to write a question mark.
----------------------------- ----------------------------- ----------------------------- --
1. Look at these words. Read them.

lid kit quit bib fill him bin

2. Circle the ‘i’ sound in each word.

3. Sound out each word, listening for the ‘i’ sound.

4. Read this sentence.

The lid is on the bin.

5. Read and then answer this question by tracing over yes or no.

Have you ever seen a lid on a bin?

52
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Medial Sound - o

May 24th 2007 13:24
You can choose Foundation Print or Victorian Modern Cursive Print for this worksheet.

Medial Sound - o
Medial Sound - o - Foundation Print



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Printing Instructions


Medial Sound - o.


Medial sound ‘o’:

1. Look these words. Read them.

box fox Tom boss dot log

2. Circle the ‘o’ sound in each word.

3. Sound out each word, listening for the ‘o’ sound.

4. Read this sentence, and then trace over the words missing from the next sentence.

Tom saw a fox on a log.

The fox is on a log.



1. Look at these words. Read them.

Ron dog Todd job doll jog

2. Circle the ‘o’ sound in each word.

3. Sound out each word, listening for the ‘o’ sound.

4. Read this sentence, and then write in the words missing from the next sentence.

Todd and Ron took the dog for a jog.


Todd and ________________ took the ___________

for a jog.



Medial Sound - o - teaching phonics
Medial Sound - o - Victorian Modern Cursive Print

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Printing Instructions





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Medial Sound - U

May 24th 2007 13:28
Medial Sound - U
Medial Sound - U



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Printing Instructions


Medial Sound - U.


Medial sound ‘u’:

1. Look at these words. Read them.

Mum gull yum fuss buzz pup bud bun

2. Circle the ‘u’ sound in each word.

3. Sound out each word, listening for the ‘u’ sound.

4. Read this sentence.

Mum and the pup had a run in the sun.


1. Look at these words. Read them.

dull sun hum hut cup bun gum bus

2. Circle the ‘u’ sound in each word.

3. Sound out each word, listening for the ‘u’ sound.

4. Read this sentence.

The bun is in the cup.


Draw a line from the sentence to the matching picture.

The sun is on the bus.
The tub is on the rug.

The jug is in the hut.


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This booklet is a hands-on reading activity which gives each child the opportunity to make his/her own reading booklet.

The benefits of this activity are many: (including)

1. The child has a sense of ownership.
2. It emphasises the medial sound 'a'.
3. The activity is integrated with Maths and Oral Expression.
It can be integrated with Science, Art, Drama, Oral Expression.
4. The child is beginning to understand that stories are sequential.
5. It is expanding the child’s reading and speaking vocabulary.
6. The benefits of working with a caring adult are immeasurable.
7. Simple comprehension questions are suggested.


reading books learning how to read
Brat the Rat - page 1 of 3

Print the above image and use with Brat the Rat - pages 2 and 3- and the Tutor Notes for Brat the Rat.

Printing Instructions


reading books learning how to read
Brat the Rat - page 2 of 3

Print the above image and use with Brat the Rat - pages 1 and 3- and the Tutor Notes for Brat the Rat.

Printing Instructions


teaching reading learning how to read
Brat the Rat - page 3 of 3

Print the above image and use with Brat the Rat - pages 1 and 2- and the Tutor Notes for Brat the Rat.

Printing Instructions




teaching notes reading lessons
Tutor Notes for 'Brat the Rat' - page 1 of 3

Print the above image and use with Brat the Rat - pages 1, 2 and 3- and the Tutor Notes for Brat the Rat.

Printing Instructions


This story emphasises/consolidates the medial sound ‘a’ in three letter words.

NB: Medial sounds are covered in Phonic Pack One pages 75 - 81.
The medial sound ‘a’ is specifically covered in Phonic Pack One, pages 76 and 77.

It would be beneficial, but not essential, to cover these lessons with your child before making up the ‘Brat the Rat’ booklet.

This lesson can be found in www.phonics.net.au by clicking on ‘Phonic Pack One’ in the top blog and scrolling down to pages 76 and 77.

To make up ‘Brat the Rat’ booklet:

1. Print the three A4 pages for the ‘Brat the Rat’ Booklet.

2. Ask your child to choose a coloured pencil and trace over the title words.
Read the title.

3. Ask your child to write her/his name on the appropriate line on the title page.

4. Look at the three A4 pages and explain to your child that each page contains 4 ‘smaller pages’ which, when cut out, are going to make up his/her own special ‘Brat the Rat’ book.

5. Ask your child to count how many pages her/ his ‘Brat the Rat’ book will have altogether. (12)

6. Look at the pages and briefly discuss each one with your child.
This is an important step – don’t miss it out.

The idea is to get the child talking, being observant, noticing what/who is in the picture, what he/she thinks of the character, what he/she thinks will happen next, expressing her/his own ideas about the pictures and the story.
Learning how to express his/her opinion and ideas is a special skill that improves with practise and is a prerequisite to writing down his/her ideas, opinions, stories etc.

During this discussion ask your child to look at the sentence(s) written on each page and point to, and read, any words that he/she already recognises.

Read the whole sentence with your child, pointing to each word as you read.
Encourage your child to sound out any words she/he doesn’t know (if it’s a sounding word).
If it’s a ‘look-say’ word just tell your child what it is and move on.

7. Ask your child to cut on the straight lines to create the twelve pages which will make up the booklet.
NB: Encourage your child to cut out carefully.
With practise and concentration he/she should be able to cut on the line.
This will help create a booklet your child can be proud of.


teaching notes reading lessons
Tutor Notes for 'Brat the Rat' - page 2 of 3

Print the above image and use with Brat the Rat - pages 1, 2 and 3- and the Tutor Notes for Brat the Rat.

Printing Instructions

8. Ask your child to read the sentences on each page -
continue to give help where necessary, but encourage the child to sound out words that can be sounded out – just say ‘that is a word you can sound out’, and give him/her time to do so.

NB: Ask your child to point to the words as he/she reads the sentences.
This:
a. reinforces the left to right eye movement.
b. reinforces the fact that sentences and phrases are made up of words.
c. encourages the child to look at each word, so enhancing word recognition. (Otherwise the child is inclined to ‘parrot’ the sentences and is not learning to recognise the words.)


9. Let your child decide the order the pages will be in his/her booklet.
Discuss with your child if it matters which order she/he decides upon –
of course the title page has to be first. (Why?)
Your child should be able to work out that the story will not ‘make sense’ if the pages are not in the right order.
Let the child move the pages around to help him/her decide.

NB: These discussions are a valuable learning experience for your child.
10. Staple the pages into a booklet.

11. Ask your child to number the pages.
This is best done in the top right hand corner of each page with a small, neat number.
This is teaching the child that the pages of a book are (usually) numbered sequentially.

12. Simple Comprehension Exercise:

NB: It is important for your child to understand/comprehend what he/she is reading.
This is a skill that is developed with practise.
At this stage of reading development it is good to have simple oral questions to answer:
a) It is encouraging the child to think about what she/he has just read.
b) It is encouraging the child to put his/her thoughts in order to express an appropriate answer.
Being able to put thoughts into order is an important pre-requisite for writing.

After reading this story, put it aside and ask your child simple questions like:

“What did Brat the Rat like to eat?”
“Why didn’t Brat the Rat like Dan?”
“Why didn’t Brat the Rat like Pam?”
“Do you think Dan liked Brat the Rat?” “Why?”
“Do you think Pam liked Brat the Rat?” “Why?”
“Who is snoring while Brat the Rat is eating?”
“Do you think Brat the Rat is brave? silly? hungry? cheeky?
“Do you think Brat the Rat is really frightened of Dan and Pam?”
“Do you think Brat is a good name for a rat?”
“What do you think would be a good name for a rat?”
“If you had a (new) kitten, what would you call it?”






teaching reading learning how to read
Tutor Notes for 'Brat the Rat' - page 3 of 3

Print the above image and use with Brat the Rat - pages 1, 2 and 3- and the Tutor Notes for Brat the Rat.

Printing Instructions

13. Let’s go on a treasure hunt:
A fun way to practise the ‘look-say’ words which appear in this booklet is to play this game with your child.
You say a word and see how quickly your child can find that word in the booklet.
To start with turn to a specific page of the booklet so your child knows the word will be on that page.
As your child gains confidence and easily recognises the words, you could use the whole booklet for a challenge.

It is essential to keep the game ‘moving’ and make it enjoyable for the child – work at his/her level –
not too many words at first – find the same word on a different page - confidence comes with success.

NB: a ‘look-say’ word is a word that cannot be sounded out e.g. likes, look, doesn’t, after, wide, fast,
woke, tea, there, do, with, then, came. When reading, the child uses the ‘sense of the sentence’ to
help him/her read ‘look-say’ words.
He, she, the, to are also look-say words but are usually easily added to the child’s reading vocabulary because they appear so often in the text.

As well as sounding out the three letter words that can be sounded out, encourage her/him to sound out the four letter words that can be sounded out. eg crept, Brat, grin, runs,


14. A beneficial exercise for your child:
a. Print off a spare booklet.
b. Cut the sentences from each page and put them in random order.
c. Encourage your child to match each sentence to the sentence which is the same in the booklet he/she has made.
d. Read the sentence.

When your child is competent with this exercise:
a. Take the sentences, one at a time.
b. Cut them into words.
c. Put the words in jumbled order.
d. Encourage your child to rearrange the words into a sentence.
e. Read the sentence.
NB: If your child needs help, let her/him refer to the little booklet.
It’s good when your child can do this without referring to the booklet.
It’s a sign that she/he is actually reading the words.



15. Integrate with Science (looking after pets), Maths (counting and numbering the pages in the booklet),
Punctuation (discussing the apostrophe in the word ‘doesn’t’, and the (?) at the end of the question)
Art (your child may like to add to the pictures on each page of the booklet, make a rat and/or cat mask).
Drama: (using the masks as dress-ups, act out the “Brat the Rat’ story – or divide into groups and make up a different cat/rat story and act it out in front of their peers.


Enjoy

13
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This booklet is a hands-on reading activity which gives each child the opportunity to make his/her own reading booklet.
The benefits of this activity are many: (including)
1. The child has a sense of ownership.
2. It emphasises the medial sound 'e'.
3. The activity is integrated with Art, Mathematics, Fine Motor Skills,
Punctuation, English and Oral English.
4. The child is beginning to understand that stories are sequential.
5. It is expanding the child’s reading and speaking vocabulary.
6. The benefits of working with a caring adult are immeasurable.


reading books learning how to read riddles
My Book of Riddles - page 1 of 4

Print the above image and use with the other pages of 'My Book of Riddles' - and the Tutor Notes for 'My Book of Riddles'.

Printing Instructions



reading books learning how to read riddles
My Book of Riddles - page 2 of 4

Print the above image and use with the other pages of 'My Book of Riddles' - and the Tutor Notes for 'My Book of Riddles'.

Printing Instructions



reading books learning how to read riddles
My Book of Riddles - page 3 of 4

Print the above image and use with the other pages of 'My Book of Riddles' - and the Tutor Notes for 'My Book of Riddles'.

Printing Instructions



reading books learning how to read riddles
My Book of Riddles - page 4 of 4

Print the above image and use with the other pages of 'My Book of Riddles' - and the Tutor Notes for 'My Book of Riddles'.

Printing Instructions





tutor teaching notes phonics
Tutor Notes for 'My Book of Riddles' - page 1 of 4

Print the above image and use with the pages of 'My Book of Riddles' - and the other pages of Tutor Notes for 'My Book of Riddles'.

Printing Instructions


This book assumes the child knows the sound for each letter of the alphabet.

If this is not the case Phonic Pack One in www.phonics.net.au covers learning the letter sounds in an exciting and interesting way.

This story emphasises/consolidates the medial sound ‘e’ in three letter words.
Practise is also given at sounding out four letter words.

NB: Medial sounds are covered in Phonic Pack One pages 75 - 81.
The medial sound ‘e’ is specifically covered in Phonic Pack One, pages 78.

It would be beneficial, but not essential, to cover this lesson with your child before making up the ‘My Book of Riddles’ booklet.

This lesson can be found in www.phonics.net.au by clicking on ‘Phonic Pack One’ in the top blog and scrolling down to page 78.

To make up ‘My Book of Riddles’ booklet:

1. Print the four A4 pages for the ‘My Book of Riddles’ Booklet.
2. Put the A4 pages which contain (smaller) pages 4,6,8,10,12,15,13 and 14 of ‘My Book of Riddles’ aside.
Do not let the child see these pages (or the mystery and challenge will evaporate).
3. Ask your child to choose a coloured pencil and trace over the title words.
Read the title.
Does your child know what a riddle is?
4. Ask your child to write her/his name on the appropriate line on the title page.

5. Cut off the small pages numbered 1 and 2 (from pages 9 and 11).
Look at pages 1 and 2 and discuss the characters with your child.
Ask your child to read the names of the characters.
Encourage your child to sound out the words she/he cannot read.

If your child has not had practise at sounding out words then you will need to model this skill.
• Point to the word (e.g. Ben)
• Point to each letter as you say its sound, then blend the sounds together to make the word. (i.e. B-e-n ----- Ben)
• Ask your child to copy the pattern.
This is a skill that improves with practise. Be patient until your child is confident enough to ‘tackle’ a word without you modelling it first.

6. Explain to your child these are the characters who are in the booklet he/she is about to make.
Notice there is a space above “Me”.

Note: You cannot sound out words like ‘me’, ‘who’ and ‘what’.
These are called ‘look-say’ words and your child will/may need help with words like this.
Explain to your child the difference between a word that he/she can sound out and a
‘look-say’ word.
When your child is reading and she/he comes across a look-say word just tell her/him
what it is and move on quickly to keep up the flow of the story.
Children learn to read look-say words by reading them frequently.



tutor teaching notes phonics
Tutor Notes for 'My Book of Riddles' - page 2 of 4

Print the above image and use with the pages of 'My Book of Riddles' - and the other pages of Tutor Notes for 'My Book of Riddles'.

Printing Instructions


7. Ask your child to draw a picture of him/herself in the space above ‘Me’.
Later on she/he is going to write/draw a page for the booklet.

8. Look at small page 3. (Ben’s riddle)
Point to the character’s name - ‘Ben’. Can your child read the name?
If your child cannot read it ask her/him to sound it out.

Briefly discuss the character with your child.
This is an important step – don’t miss it out.

The idea is to get the child talking, being observant, what he/she thinks of the character and expressing her/his own ideas about the character.
Learning how to express his/her opinion and ideas is a special skill that improves with practise and is a pre-requisite to writing down his/her ideas, opinions, stories etc.

9. Repeat No 8 with the rest of the characters – Meg, Tess, Fred and Jess.

----------------------------- ----------------------------- ---------------------


10. Go back to Ben’s riddle page.
Ask your child to read Ben’s riddle – give help where necessary – encourage your child to sound out words that can be sounded out.
Tell your child any ‘look-say’ words he/she cannot read.

Discuss the picture clues with your child.
‘What clues can the child see?’
What does she/he think is in the pen?

Important: Let your child solve the riddle.
This is helping your child develop many appropriate skills (thinking skills, problem solving skills, comprehension skills – to name but three…)

11. Repeat the steps in No10 with the other ‘riddle pages’.

----------------------------- ------------------------

12. Now show your child the pages which have the answers written on them:
• You read Ben’s riddle.
• Ask your child to read his answer.
• You read Meg’s riddle.
• Ask your child to read her answer …
… and so on with Tess, Fred and Jess.

----------------------------- ---------------------
7. Ask your child to draw a picture of him/herself in the space above ‘Me’.
Later on she/he is going to write/draw a page for the booklet.

8. Look at small page 3. (Ben’s riddle)
Point to the character’s name - ‘Ben’. Can your child read the name?
If your child cannot read it ask her/him to sound it out.

Briefly discuss the character with your child.
This is an important step – don’t miss it out.

The idea is to get the child talking, being observant, what he/she thinks of the character and expressing her/his own ideas about the character.
Learning how to express his/her opinion and ideas is a special skill that improves with practise and is a pre-requisite to writing down his/her ideas, opinions, stories etc.

9. Repeat No 8 with the rest of the characters – Meg, Tess, Fred and Jess.

----------------------------- ----------------------------- ---------------------


10. Go back to Ben’s riddle page.
Ask your child to read Ben’s riddle – give help where necessary – encourage your child to sound out words that can be sounded out.
Tell your child any ‘look-say’ words he/she cannot read.

Discuss the picture clues with your child.
‘What clues can the child see?’
What does she/he think is in the pen?

Important: Let your child solve the riddle.
This is helping your child develop many appropriate skills (thinking skills, problem solving skills, comprehension skills – to name but three…)

11. Repeat the steps in No10 with the other ‘riddle pages’.

----------------------------- ------------------------

12. Now show your child the pages which have the answers written on them:
• You read Ben’s riddle.
• Ask your child to read his answer.
• You read Meg’s riddle.
• Ask your child to read her answer …
… and so on with Tess, Fred and Jess.

----------------------------- ---------------------



tutor teaching notes phonics
Tutor Notes for 'My Book of Riddles' - page 3 of 4

Print the above image and use with the pages of 'My Book of Riddles' - and the other pages of Tutor Notes for 'My Book of Riddles'.

Printing Instructions

Your child may need a break before tackling pages 13 and 14.
This is a fun activity.
----------------------------- ----------------------------- --------------
Before you start this section cut out small pages 13 and 14.
13. Look at small page 13.
Ask your child to write his/her name on the line before the word ‘Riddle’ and explain he/she is going to write a riddle just like Ben, Meg (etc)

Notice he/she will need a possessive apostrophe – explain why a possessive apostrophe is required. Don’t worry if he/she finds it difficult to understand – it will be the beginning of
him/her understanding and remembering this difficult concept.
14. Ask your child to write her/his name on the line next to the tent.

15. Ask your child to draw a picture of him/herself in the space above her/his name.
He/she will be saying, “Can you tell who is in the tent?”

16. Explain to your child to think about who/what he/she is going to have hiding in the tent.
(It can be anything – doesn’t have to be a ‘medial ‘e’ sound’ word).
Explain this will be his/her secret. (children love secrets)

17. Ask the child to take page 14 to a spot where you cannot see what he/she is drawing and
explain he/she needs to draw who/what is in the tent.
If you think it would be helpful let your child go back and have a look at the pages in the booklet where the answers to the riddles are revealed.
If your child is confident ask him/her to finish the sentence in the speech bubble.
Accept all genuine effort including inventive spelling – at this stage of your child’s development ‘having a go’ is GREAT.
To complete this page your child may like to draw a picture of him/herself and write her/his name on the line.

18. Ask your child to take page 13 to his/ her secret spot and draw a clue in the open door of the tent.
It would be helpful to go back and look at the pages in the booklet where the clues are given so your child can see, that for a clue, he/she needs draw only a little bit of who/whatever is hiding in the tent.

19. Get your child to show you the clue (page 13) and you try and guess who/what is hiding in the tent.
Make it interesting – have two or three guesses even if the answer is obvious.

20. Your child shows you page 14 to reveal what/who is hiding in the tent.
If he/she has not completed the sentence help her/him do so.



tutor teaching notes phonics
Tutor Notes for 'My Book of Riddles' - page 4 of 4

Print the above image and use with the pages of 'My Book of Riddles' - and the other pages of Tutor Notes for 'My Book of Riddles'.

Printing Instructions


21.Ask your child to cut on the straight lines to create the pages which will make up the booklet.
NB: Encourage your child to cut out carefully.
With practise and concentration he/she should be able to cut on the line.
This will help create a booklet your child can be proud of.

22. Ask your child to read the sentences on each page -
continue to give help where necessary, but encourage the child to sound out words that can be sounded out – just say ‘that is a word you can sound out’, and give him/her time to do so.

NB: Ask your child to point to the words as he/she reads the sentences.
This:
a. reinforces the left to right eye movement.
b. reinforces the fact that sentences and phrases are made up of words.
c. encourages the child to look at each word, so enhancing word recognition. (Otherwise the child is inclined to ‘parrot’ the sentences and is not learning to recognise the words.)

23. Ask your child to put the pages in the correct order – include page 15 (work it later)
As the pages are numbered he/she will need to put the numbers in sequential order.
Give help (only) as needed.

24. Staple the pages into a booklet.
25. Read the booklet.
----------------------------- ----------------------------- -----

26. Work page 15 later – when your child is refreshed and ready for another challenge.

After your child has completed page 15 ask him/her to put each word into a simple oral sentence:
• this lets you know if he/she knows the meaning of each word
• and gives your child practise at thinking and expressing her/himself in sentences.
This is a pre-requisite for Writing in sentences.

27. Let’s go on a treasure hunt:
A fun way to practise the ‘look-say’ words which appear in this booklet is to play this game with your child.
You say a word and see how quickly your child can find that word in the booklet.
To start with turn to a specific page of the booklet so your child knows the word will be on that page.
As your child gains confidence and easily recognises the words, you could use the whole booklet for a challenge.

It is essential to keep the game ‘moving’ and make it enjoyable for the child – work at his/her level – not too many words at first – find the same word on a different page - confidence comes with success.

28. This booklet activity is/can be integrated with:
Maths (counting eggs to ten, and putting the numbered pages in order),
Punctuation (discussing the possessive apostrophe, and the (?) at the end of the questions)
Art (drawing pictures of self, and who/what is in the tent).
Fine Motor Skills ( drawing, colouring in and cutting out activities improve fine motor skills)
English: ( discuss speech bubbles and what they are used for, Writing the answer to the riddle)
Oral English (discussions, putting words into sentences)


Enjoy


22
Vote
   


‘Little Books’ Reading Books is a work in progress.
It consists of several ‘little books’ designed to provide a child who is learning how to read, with booklets he/she can read with enjoyment and confidence.

As soon as a child begins to recognise words it is beneficial for him/her to be provided with books which have a limited and repeated vocabulary:
a. This gives the child confidence because she/he can ‘read’ the book.
b. The child learns to recognise the words that are repeated and so is
expanding her/his reading vocabulary.
c. A child loves to turn the pages and read a book, just like grownups.

Click on the heading 'Little Books for Emerging Readers' in the top blog of phonics.net.au to access other Little Books.


This booklet is a hands-on reading activity which gives each child the opportunity to make his/her own reading booklet.
The benefits of this activity are many: (including)
1. The child has a sense of ownership.
2. It emphasises the medial sound 'i'.
3. The activity is integrated with Mathematics, Punctuation and Art.
4. The child is beginning to understand that books have a title page.
5. It is expanding the child’s reading and speaking vocabulary.
6. The benefits of working with a caring adult are immeasurable.
7. A simple comprehension question is included at the bottom of each
page.
emerging readers reading book comprehension
'What do you think?' - page 1

Print above image and use with the 'What do you think?' - page 2 - and the Tutor Notes - pages 1-6.

Printing Instructions


emerging readers reading book comprehension
'What do you think?' - page 2

Print above image and use with the 'What do you think?' - page 1 - and the Tutor Notes - pages 1-6.

Printing Instructions



tutor notes for reading book comprehension
Tutor Notes for 'What do you think?' - page one

Print above image and use with the 'What do you think?' - pages 1 and 2 - and the Tutor Notes - pages 2-6.

Printing Instructions

This book assumes the child knows the sound for each letter of the alphabet.

If this is not the case Phonic Pack One in www.phonics.net.au covers learning the sound for each letter in an exciting and interesting way.

This booklet, ‘What do you think?’, emphasises/consolidates the medial sound ‘i’ in three letter words.
Practise is also given at sounding out four and five letter words.

NB: Medial sounds are covered in Phonic Pack One pages 75 - 81.
The medial sound ‘i’ is specifically covered in Phonic Pack One, page 79.

It would be beneficial, but not essential, to cover this lesson with your child before making up the ‘What do you think?’ booklet.

This lesson can be found in www.phonics.net.au by clicking on ‘Phonic Pack One’ in the top blog and scrolling down to page 79.

To make up ‘What do you think?’ booklet:

1. Print the two A4 pages for the ‘What do you think?’ Booklet.

2. Ask your child to look at the two A4 pages and explain that each page contains 4 ‘smaller pages’ which, when cut out, will make his/her own special ‘What do you think?’ book.

3. Ask your child to count how many pages her/ his ‘What do you think?’ book will have altogether. (8)

4. Ask your child to read the title.
Look at the question mark. Explain that a question mark is used at the end of a question.
Discuss with your child the fact that the question is in a speech bubble.
We know who is speaking because the speech bubble points to him/her.

Look at the ‘thinking bubble’.
We know it is a thinking bubble because it has bubbles pointing to the person who is thinking.

Can your child see the difference between the speech bubble (a character talking) and the thinking bubble (a character thinking)?

5. Ask your child to take a lead pencil, an eraser and a mirror and draw his/her face in the picture frame because this is her/his booklet and she/he is the one who is going to answer the question on each page of the booklet.


tutor notes for reading book comprhension
Tutor Notes for 'What do you think?' - page two

Print above image and use with the 'What do you think?' - pages 1 and 2 - and the Tutor Notes - pages 1 and 3-6.

Printing Instructions

Hint: Before your child draws his/her face ask him/her to look in a mirror and observe:
What shape is your face?
What colour is your hair?
Have you got straight/curly hair?
How long is your hair?
Look at your eyes. What colour are they? How far down your face are they?
What shape are they?
Where are your eye lashes?
Where are your eyebrows?
Where are your ears? What shape are they?
When you draw your face are your eyes going to be higher than your ears?
Look at your mouth? What shape are your lips?

Ask your child to observe how big the picture frame is and decide how big his/her face can be to fit in the frame. Fitting a specific drawing into a specified space is not always an easy task for a child to achieve.

When your child is satisfied with her/his drawing ask her/him to colour it in.
Use coloured pencils not felt pens.

Note: Your child will need time to do this activity properly.
You may need to allow one whole lesson time to achieve a good result.

----------------------------- ----------------------------- -----------------------------
Note: Your child may need more than one lesson to complete the following activities.
If necessary work one page at a time.
To gain maximum benefit for your child each page needs to done thoroughly.
You will be able to gauge when it is time to pause and return to the booklet latter.


6. Look at the pages and briefly discuss the pictures on each page with your child.
This is an important step – don’t miss it out.

The idea is to get the child talking, being observant, noticing what/who is in the picture, what he/she thinks each character is doing, expressing her/his own ideas about the pictures.
.
Note: Learning how to express his/her opinion and ideas is a special skill that improves with practise and is a prerequisite to writing down his/her ideas, opinions, stories etc.

7. Go back to the page where the pig and the imp are doing a jig.
Look at the characters.
Has your child noticed the imp’s hat is not coloured in?
Ask her/him to colour it in.

Note: colouring in neatly and within the shape provided helps improve fine motor skills.

tutor notes for reading book comprhension
Tutor Notes for 'What do you think?' - page three

Print above image and use with the 'What do you think?' - pages 1 and 2 - and the Tutor Notes - pages 1 and 2, and 4-6.

Printing Instructions

8. Ask your child to look at the question written on this page and point to, and read, any words that he/she already recognises.

Point to any three letter word (that can be sounded out) that your child does not recognise and encourage him/her to sound it out.
If your child has not had much practise at sounding out words you may need to model the correct way of doing this.
ie - sound out each letter of the word separately eg j-i-g, then blend the sounds together until the child can hear the word.- ‘jig’.

Repeat the above process with any word that can be sounded out.

9. Now read the whole question with your child, pointing to each word as you read.
Encourage your child to sound out any words she/he still doesn’t recognise (if it’s a sounding
word).
If it’s a ‘look-say’ word (one that can’t be sounded out) just tell your child what it is and move on. (eg do, you, of)

10. Simple Comprehension Exercise:
NB: It’s important for your child to understand/comprehend what he/she is reading.
This is a skill that is developed with practise.

At this stage of reading development it is good to have simple questions to answer:
a) It is encouraging the child to think about what she/he has just read.
b) It is encouraging the child to put his/her thoughts in order to express an appropriate
answer.
Being able to put thoughts into order is an important pre-requisite for writing.

At the end of each page in this booklet your child is asked to answer the question by choosing an appropriate answer from the boxes – yes no maybe.

Ask your child to draw a circle around the word she/he thinks best answers the question.

It’s important to discuss with your child why he/she chose that answer.

Remember!! Learning how to express his/her opinion and ideas is a special skill that improves with practise and is a prerequisite to writing down his/her ideas, opinions, stories etc.

11. Repeat numbers 8,9,10 (as above) for each page (except the last page with the lists of words)
Note: When you come to the appropriate page:
• ask your child to draw the twig Kim is using to dig for the fig.
• ask your child to finish drawing, then colour in Bill the Chimp’s tail.
• ask your child to draw a sun in the sky next to the mill.
• ask your child to colour in the fish that is swimming with Jill.
Make it as colourful as possible.



tutor notes for reading book comprhension
Tutor Notes for 'What do you think?' - page four

Print above image and use with the 'What do you think?' - pages 1 and 2 - and the Tutor Notes - pages 1-3, 5 and 6.

Printing Instructions

12. Look at the last page.
Ask your child to point to, and read each list of words.
If your child can read the word without sounding it out this is GOOD.
Let your child put a tick next to these words.
If your child cannot read the word (be patient) ask him/her to sound it out.

The last column has four and five letter words which can be sounded out.
Treat this as a challenge – children love a challenge – PRAISE all effort.

From time to time return to this page to give practise as needed.
When your child can confidently read a word, let her/him tick it.
Keep practising until all words have a tick.

13. Ask your child to cut on the straight lines to create the eight pages which will make up the
booklet.
NB: Encourage your child to cut out carefully.
With practise and concentration he/she should be able to cut on the line.
This will help create a booklet your child can be proud of.

14. Ask your child to read the sentences on each page - continue to give help where necessary. If your child comes to a word he/she cannot read:
• encourage her/him to sound out the word if it can be sounded out –
just say ‘that is a word you can sound out’, and give him/her time to do so.
• if it’s a ‘look-say’ word (one that can’t be sounded out) just tell your child what it is and move on. (eg do, you, of)

NB: Ask your child to point to the words as he/she reads the sentences.
This:
a. reinforces the left to right eye movement.
b. reinforces the fact that sentences and phrases are made up of words.
c. encourages the child to look at each word, so enhancing word recognition. (Otherwise the child is inclined to ‘parrot’ the sentences and is not learning to recognise the words.)

15. Let your child decide the order the pages will be in his/her booklet.
Discuss with your child if it matters which order she/he decides upon –
of course the title page has to be first. (Why?)

Some books tell a story and the pages have to be in order for the story to make sense.
In this booklet each page stands alone so it doesn’t matter what order the pages are in.
The page which has the lists of words should be last. (Why?)

16. Staple the pages into a booklet.


tutor notes for reading book comprhension
Tutor Notes for 'What do you think?' - page five

Print above image and use with the 'What do you think?' - pages 1 and 2 - and the Tutor Notes - pages 1-4 and 6.

Printing Instructions

17. Ask your child to number the pages.
This is best done in the top right hand corner of each page with a small, neat number.
This is teaching the child that the pages of a book are (usually) numbered sequentially.

18. Simple Comprehension Exercise:
NB: It is important for your child to understand/comprehend what he/she is reading.
This is a skill that is developed with practise.
At this stage of reading development it is good to have simple oral questions to answer:
a) It is encouraging the child to think about what she/he has just read or perhaps it’s a question that expands your child’s general knowledge.
b) It is encouraging the child to put his/her thoughts in order to express an appropriate answer.
Being able to put thoughts into order is an important pre-requisite for writing.
(I can’t emphasise this enough.)

After reading this story, put it aside and ask your child simple questions like:

With whom was the pig doing a jig?
Do you think Bill the Chimp likes coconut milk?
Would you like to swim with a school of fish?
What do you think is in the bin that Jim is going to hit with a tin?
What is a mother goat called?
What plants do we have in our garden? (go and have a look)
What insects could we find in our garden?
Do we have birds visit our garden?


19. Let’s go on a treasure hunt:
A fun way to practise the ‘look-say’ words which appear in this booklet is to play this game with your child.
You say a word and see how quickly your child can find that word in the booklet.
To start with turn to a specific page of the booklet so your child knows the word will be on that page.
As your child gains confidence and easily recognises the words, you could use the whole booklet for a challenge.

It is essential to keep the game ‘moving’ and make it enjoyable for the child – work at his/her level – not too many words at first – find the same word on a different page - confidence comes with success.

NB: a ‘look-say’ word is a word that cannot be sounded out e.g. what, do, you, with, make, who.
When reading the child uses the ‘sense of the sentence’ to help him/her read ‘look-say’ words.
He, she, the, to are also look-say words but are usually easily added to the child’s reading vocabulary because they appear so often in the text.

As well as sounding out the three letter words that can be sounded out, encourage her/him to sound out the four letter words that can be sounded out.eg hits, swims, twig, spill, fins.


tutor notes for reading book comprehension
Tutor Notes for 'What do you think?' - page six

Print above image and use with the 'What do you think?' - pages 1 and 2 - and the Tutor Notes - pages 1 - 5.

Printing Instructions

A beneficial exercise for your child:
a. Print off a spare booklet.
b. Cut the sentences from each page and put them in random order.
c. Encourage your child to match each sentence to the sentence which is the same in the booklet he/she has made.
d. Read the sentence.

When your child is competent with this exercise:
a. Take the sentences, one at a time.
b. Cut them into words.
c. Put the words in jumbled order.
d. Encourage your child to rearrange the words into a sentence.
e. Read the sentence.
NB: If your child needs help, let her/him refer to the little booklet.
It’s good when your child can do this without referring to the booklet.
It’s a sign that she/he is actually reading the words.



21. Integrate with Maths (counting and numbering the pages in the booklet, fitting the drawing of a face into the size of the picture frame),
Punctuation (discussing the (?) at the end of a question, observe that sentences begin with a capital letter),
Art (drawing picture of self, completing pictures).

Enjoy










19
Vote
   


This booklet is a hands-on reading activity which gives each child the opportunity to make his/her own reading booklet.

The benefits of this activity are many: (including)
1. The child has a sense of ownership.
2. It emphasises the medial sound 'o'.
3. The activity is/can be integrated with Art, Mathematics, Fine Motor
Skills, Punctuation, English, Oral English, Science and learning about
speech bubbles.
4. The child is beginning to understand that stories are sequential.
5. It is expanding the child’s reading and speaking vocabulary.
6. The benefits of working with a caring adult are immeasurable.


reading book teaching reading
Molly Has a Dog... - page 1 of 2

Print the above image and use with the other pages of 'Molly Has a Dog...'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog ...'.

Printing Instructions

reading book teaching reading
Molly Has a Dog... - page 2 of 2

Print the above image and use with the other pages of 'Molly Has a Dog...'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog ...'.

Printing Instructions





phonics medial sound 'o'
Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog...' - page 1 of 5

Print the above image and use with the booklet pages of 'Molly Has a Dog...'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog ...'.

Printing Instructions

Tutor Notes - page 1
This book assumes the child knows the sound for each letter of the alphabet.

If this is not the case Phonic Pack One in www.phonics.net.au covers learning the sound for each letter in an exciting and interesting way.

This booklet, ‘Molly Has a Dog …’, emphasises/consolidates the medial sound ‘o’ in three letter words.
Practise is also given at sounding out four letter words and learning to read some common look-say words.

NB: Medial sounds are covered in Phonic Pack One pages 75 - 81.
The medial sound ‘o’ is specifically covered in Phonic Pack One, page 80.

It would be beneficial, but not essential, to cover this lesson with your child before making up the ‘Molly Has a Dog…’ booklet.

This lesson can be found in www.phonics.net.au by clicking on ‘Phonic Pack One’ in the top blog and scrolling down to page 80.

To make up ‘Molly Has a Dog …’ booklet:

1. Print the two A4 pages for the ‘Molly Has a Dog …’ Booklet.

2. Ask your child to look at the two A4 pages and explain that each page
contains 4 ‘smaller pages’ which, when cut out, will make his/her own
special ‘Molly Has a Dog …’ book.

3. Ask your child to count how many pages her/ his ‘Molly Has a Dog …’
book will have altogether. (8)

4. Ask your child to read the title. – (may need help)

Why is the title followed by three dots?
(Because the sentence is not complete – there is more to come.)


5. Ask your child to write her/his name on the line provided.

Make sure he/she is using the correct pencil hold, is forming the letters correctly and begins her/his name with a capital letter.
Explain that names begin with a capital letter.

6. Look at the pages and briefly discuss the pictures on each page with
your child.
This is an important step – don’t miss it out.

The idea is to get the child talking, being observant, noticing what/who is in the picture, what he/she thinks each character is doing, expressing her/his own ideas about the pictures.
.
Note: Learning how to express his/her opinion and ideas is a special skill that improves with practise and is a prerequisite to writing down his/her ideas, opinions, stories etc.


phonics medial sound 'o'
Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog...' - page 2 of 5

Print the above image and use with the booklet pages of 'Molly Has a Dog...'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog ...'.

Printing Instructions

Tutor Notes - page 2
NB: Simple Comprehension:
It’s important for your child to understand/comprehend what
he/she is reading.
This is a skill that is developed with practise.

At this stage of reading development it is good to have simple
questions to answer:
a) It is encouraging the child to think about what she/he is reading.
b) It is encouraging the child to put his/her thoughts in order to
express an appropriate answer.

Remember!! Learning how to express his/her opinion and ideas is a special skill that improves with practise and is a prerequisite to writing down his/her ideas, opinions, stories etc.

7. Go back to the page with the sentence, ‘Molly has a dog called Rod’,
and discuss with your child: (simple comprehension)
• both names have a capital letter.
• the title of the book Molly is reading?
• why Molly would be reading a book with this title?
• what does she/he think Rod is thinking?


8. Ask your child to look at the sentence written on this page and point to,
and read, any words that he/she already recognises.

Point to any three letter word (that can be sounded out) your child does not recognise and encourage him/her to sound it out.
If your child has not had much practise at sounding out words you may need to model the correct way of doing this.
ie - sound out each letter of the word separately eg d-o-g, then blend the sounds together until the child can hear the word.- ‘dog’.

Repeat the above process with any word that can be sounded out.

NB: Have a special look at the word ‘Molly’.

Explain to your child that:
• when double letters occur when sounding out a word,
the sound of the letters is said only once (not twice)
• ‘y’ on the end of a word often says ‘ee’.
So, when sounding out the word Molly, it sounds like – ‘M-o-l-ee’ -
Molly and Hoppy sounds like - ‘H-o-p-ee’ - Hoppy (see if your child remembers this when you come to read the sentence, ‘Ron has a pet frog called Hoppy’.)


phonics medial sound 'o'
Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog...' - page 3 of 5

Print the above image and use with the booklet pages of 'Molly Has a Dog...'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog ...'.

Printing Instructions

Tutor Notes - page 3
9. Now read the whole sentence with your child, pointing to each word as
you read.
Encourage your child to sound out any words she/he still doesn’t
recognise (if it’s a sounding word).
If it’s a ‘look-say’ word (one that can’t be sounded out) just tell your child
what it is and move on. (eg called, out, for, likes)

10. Repeat numbers 7 (don’t forget appropriate simple comprehension questions) (read and discuss the speech bubbles) ,8 and 9 (as above) for each page (except the last page with the lists of words).
The page with the sentence, ‘It was so hot Tom and Bob had a swim in the pond’ has an empty swimming pool on the page. Ask your child to draw Tom and Bob having a swim in the pond.
11. Look at the last page.
Ask your child to point to, and read each list of words.
If your child can read the word without sounding it out this is GOOD.
Let your child put a tick next to these words.
If your child cannot read the word (be patient) ask him/her to sound it out.

From time to time return to this page to give practise as needed.
When your child can confidently read a word, let her/him tick it.
Keep practising until all words have a tick.

12. Ask your child to cut on the straight lines to create the eight pages
which will make up the booklet.
NB: Encourage your child to cut out carefully.
With practise and concentration he/she should be able to cut on the line.
This will help create a booklet your child can be proud of.


13. Ask your child to read the sentences on each page - continue to give
help where necessary.

If your child comes to a word he/she cannot read:
• encourage her/him to sound out the word if it can be sounded out –
just say ‘that is a word you can sound out’, and give him/her time to do so.
• if it’s a ‘look-say’ word (one that can’t be sounded out) just tell your child what it is and move on.

NB: Ask your child to point to the words as he/she reads the sentences.
This:
a. reinforces the left to right eye movement.
b. reinforces the fact that sentences and phrases are made up of words.
c. encourages the child to look at each word, so enhancing word
recognition. (Otherwise the child is inclined to ‘parrot’ the sentences and
is not learning to recognise the words.)





phonics medial sound 'o'
Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog...' - page 4 of 5

Print the above image and use with the booklet pages of 'Molly Has a Dog...'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog ...'.

Printing Instructions

Tutor Notes - page 4
14. Let your child decide the order the pages will be in his/her booklet.
Discuss with your child if it matters which order she/he decides upon –
of course the title page has to be first. (Why?)

Some books tell a story and the pages have to be in order for the story to make sense.
In this booklet the pages go in pairs.
Does your child see that there are two pages about each pair of characters - Molly and Rod - Tom and Bob - Ron and Hoppy.
Do the two pages for each pair have to be in a certain order to correctly tell the story about these characters?

Does the order of these pairs of pages matter?
Swap them around to decide.
The page which has the lists of words should be last. (Why?)

15. Staple the pages into a booklet.

16. Ask your child to number the pages.
This is best done in the top right hand corner of each page with a small,
neat number.
This is teaching the child that the pages of a book are (usually) numbered
sequentially.

17. Simple Comprehension Exercise:

NB: It is important for your child to understand/comprehend what
he/she is reading.
This is a skill that is developed with practise.
At this stage of reading development it is good to have simple
oral questions to answer:
a) It is encouraging the child to think about what she/he has just
read or perhaps it’s a question
that expands your child’s general knowledge.
b) It is encouraging the child to put his/her thoughts in order to
express an appropriate answer.
Being able to put thoughts into order is an important
pre-requisite for writing.
(I can’t emphasise this enough.)

After reading this story, put it aside and ask your child simple
questions like:

What is the name of Molly’s dog?
Do you think she looks after him properly?
What makes you think so? (She is reading about caring for a
puppy. He looks healthy and happy.)
How do you think Rod got into the pot?
How do you think Molly got him out?

Who does Bob belong to?
How often would Tom need to take him for a jog?
How do we know it was a hot day when Tom and Bob went for a jog?
(Your child may like to draw a sun in the sky on the page where they are
jogging.)

Who has a pet frog called Hoppy?
What do you think Hoppy was doing in the flower pot?
Would it be fun to have a pet frog?
How would it be different to having a pet dog or cat?


phonics medial sound 'o'
Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog...' - page 5 of 5

Print the above image and use with the booklet pages of 'Molly Has a Dog...'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Molly Has a Dog ...'.

Printing Instructions

Tutor Notes - page 5
18. Let’s go on a treasure hunt:
A fun way to practise the ‘look-say’ words which appear in this
booklet is to play this game with your child.
You say a word and see how quickly your child can find that word in
the booklet.
To start with, turn to a specific page of the booklet so your child
knows the word will be on that page.
As your child gains confidence and easily recognises the words, you
could use the whole booklet for a challenge.

It is essential to keep the game ‘moving’ and make it enjoyable for the
child – work at his/her level – not too many words at first – find the
same word on a different page - confidence comes with success.

NB: a ‘look-say’ word is a word that cannot be sounded out e.g. called,
out, for, was, put, likes.
.
When reading, the child uses the ‘sense of the sentence’ to help
him/her read ‘look-say’ words.
Eg. he, she, the, to are look-say words but are usually easily
added to the child’s reading vocabulary because they appear so
often in a text.

As well as sounding out the three letter words that can be
sounded out, encourage her/him to sound out the four letter words
that can be sounded out.eg went, swim, pond.

19. A beneficial exercise for your child:
a. Print off a spare booklet.
b. Cut the sentences from each page and put them in random order.
c. Encourage your child to match each sentence to the sentence which is
the same in the booklet he/she has made.
d. Read the sentence.

When your child is competent with this exercise:
a. Take the sentences, one at a time.
b. Cut them into words.
c. Put the words in jumbled order.
d. Encourage your child to rearrange the words into a sentence.
e. Read the sentence.
NB: If your child needs help, let her/him refer to the little booklet.
It’s good when your child can do this without referring to the booklet.
It’s a sign that she/he is actually reading the words.


20. Integrate with Maths: counting and numbering the pages in the booklet,
fitting the drawing of Tom and Bob swimming into the space of the
swimming pool.
Punctuation: discuss the full stop at the end of each sentence, observe
that sentences begin with a capital letter, observe that all names begin
with a capital letter.
Art: drawing Tom and Bob swimming in the pool, drawing a sun in
the appropriate picture.
Science: Talk about looking after pets, study the life cycle of a frog.

Enjoy




19
Vote
   


This booklet is a hands-on reading activity which gives each child the opportunity to make his/her own reading booklet.

The benefits of this activity are many: (including)
1. The child has a sense of ownership.
2. It emphasises the medial sound 'u'.
3. The activity is/can be integrated with Art, Mathematics, Fine Motor
Skills, English (punctuation, speech bubbles, contractions), Science,
Physical Education.
4. The child is beginning to understand that stories are sequential.
5. It is expanding the child’s reading and speaking vocabulary.
6. The benefits of working with a caring adult are immeasurable.


reading lessons
Five Funny Bugs - page 1 of 4

Print the above image and use with the other pages of 'Five Funny Bugs' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs'.

Printing Instructions

reading book teaching reading
Five Funny Bugs - page 2 of 4

Print the above image and use with the other pages of 'Five Funny Bugs' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs'.

Printing Instructions

reading book teaching reading medial sound 'u'
Five Funny Bugs - page 3 of 4

Print the above image and use with the other pages of 'Five Funny Bugs' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs'.

Printing Instructions

medial sound 'u'
Five Funny Bugs - page 4 of 4

Print the above image and use with the other pages of 'Five Funny Bugs' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs'.

Printing Instructions



tutor notes for reading book comprhension
Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs' - page 1 of 5

Print the above image and use with the booklet pages of 'Five Funny Bugs'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs'.

Printing Instructions

Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs'.
This book assumes the child knows the sound for each letter of the alphabet.

If this is not the case Phonic Pack One in www.phonics.net.au covers learning the sound for each letter in an exciting and interesting way.

This booklet, ‘Five Funny Bugs’ emphasises/consolidates the medial sound ‘u’ in three letter words.

Practise is also given at sounding out four and five letter words and learning to read some common look-say words.

NB: Medial sounds are covered in Phonic Pack One pages 75 - 81.
The medial sound ‘u’ is specifically covered in Phonic Pack One, page 81.

It would be beneficial, but not essential, to cover this lesson with your child before making up the ‘Five Funny Bugs’ booklet.

This lesson can be found in www.phonics.net.au by clicking on ‘Phonic Pack One’ in the top blog and scrolling down to page 81.

This hands on, reading activity can be/is integrated into several learning areas:
Art, Mathematics, Fine Motor Skills, English (punctuation, speech bubbles, contractions), Science, Physical Education.

To make up the ‘Five Funny Bugs’ booklet:

1. Print the four A4 pages for the ‘Five Funny Bugs’ Booklet.
2. Ask your child to look at the four A4 pages and explain that each page contains 4 ‘smaller pages’ which, when cut out, will make his/her own special ‘Five Funny Bugs’ book.

3. Ask your child to count how many pages her/ his ‘Five Funny Bugs’ book will have altogether.

4. Ask your child to read the title. – (may need help)

5. Ask your child to colour in the letters that make up the title.
NB: Colouring in carefully and neatly helps improve fine motor skills.
Give your child time to achieve this task.

6. Ask your child to write her/his name on the line provided.

Make sure he/she is using the correct pencil hold, is forming the letters correctly and begins her/his name with a capital letter.
Explain that names begin with a capital letter.

7. Look at the pages and briefly discuss the pictures on each page with your child.
This is an important step – don’t miss it out.

The idea is to get the child talking, being observant, noticing what/who is in the picture, what he/she thinks each character is doing, expressing her/his own ideas about the pictures.

Note: Learning how to express his/her opinion and ideas is a special skill that improves with practise and is a prerequisite to writing down his/her ideas, opinions, stories etc.


tutor notes for reading book comprhension
Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs' - page 2 of 5

Print the above image and use with the booklet pages of 'Five Funny Bugs'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs'.

Printing Instructions

NB: Simple Comprehension:
It’s important for your child to understand/comprehend what
he/she is observing and reading.
This is a skill that is developed with practise.

At this stage of reading development it is good to have simple questions
to answer:
a) It is encouraging the child to think about what she/he is reading.
b) It is encouraging the child to put his/her thoughts in order to
express an appropriate answer.

Remember!! Learning how to express his/her opinion and ideas is a special skill that improves with practise and is a prerequisite to writing down his/her ideas, opinions, stories etc.

8. Go back to the page with the sentence, ‘One sunny day five funny bugs went for a run in the sun’. Observe and discuss with your child: (simple comprehension)
• How many bugs can we see?
• What are they? (snail, ant, ladybird, caterpillar, grasshopper)
• What are they doing?
• Read what each bug is saying – read together – let your child read the words she/he recognises and you quickly fill in the rest. Don’t labour the reading of the speech bubbles – keep it fluent – they are there to provide interest and fun. It is OK at this point if you read the speech bubbles.

9. Ask your child to look at the sentence written on this page and point to, and read, any words that he/she already recognises.

Point to any three letter word (that can be sounded out) your child does not recognise and encourage him/her to sound it out.
If your child has not had much practise at sounding out words you may need to model the correct way to do this.
ie - sound out each letter of the word separately eg r-u-n, then blend the sounds together until the child can hear the word.- ‘run’.

Repeat the above process with any word your child can sound out.

NB: Have a special look at the word ‘funny’.
Explain to your child that:
• when double letters occur when sounding out a word,
the sound of the letters is said only once (not twice)
• ‘y’ on the end of a word often says ‘ee’.
So, when sounding out the word ‘funny’, it sounds like – ‘f-u-n-ee’ -
funny and ‘muddy’ sounds like - ‘m-u-d-ee’ - muddy
(see if your child remembers this when you come to read the word,
‘muddy’.)

10. Now read the whole sentence with your child, pointing to each word as
you read.
Encourage your child to sound out any words she/he still doesn't recognize (if it’s a sounding word).
If it’s a ‘look-say’ word (one that can’t be sounded out) just tell your child what it is and move on. (eg one, day, five, for, the)

tutor notes for reading book comprhension
Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs' - page 3 of 5

Print the above image and use with the booklet pages of 'Five Funny Bugs'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs'.

Printing Instructions

11. Repeat numbers 8 (don’t forget appropriate simple comprehension questions) (read and discuss the speech bubbles), to 10 (as above) for each page (except the last page with the lists of words).
When you come to the pages that have words that rhyme, read the sentences to your child and ask him/her to tell you the words that rhyme. If your child has not done this before you will need to explain about words that rhyme. When you read the sentences emphasise the words that rhyme until your child can hear them. If your child has difficulty with this exercise give her/him extra practise. You say a word (eg mug) and she/he says a word that rhymes (eg bug).

The page with the sentence, ‘Draw the five funny bugs singing and
dancing and running in the sun after the gull had flown away and
they were safe’ is asking your child to draw this scene.
Give your child time to do this task properly:
• It is a comprehension exercise (does your child draw the correct 5 bugs)
• It is encouraging your child to use his/her imagination
• Your child has to use spacial awareness to fit the 5 bugs into the space
provided
• Drawing and colouring in neatly is helping to improve fine motor skills

12. Look at the last page.
Ask your child to point to, and read each list of words.
If your child can read the word without sounding it out this is GOOD.
Let your child put a tick next to these words.
If your child cannot read the word (be patient) ask him/her to sound it
out.

From time to time return to this page to give practise as needed.
When your child can confidently read a word, let her/him tick it.
Keep practising until all words have a tick.


13. Ask your child to cut on the straight lines to create the sixteen pages
that will make up the booklet.
NB: Encourage your child to cut out carefully.
With practise and concentration he/she should be able to cut on the line.
(fine motor skills)
This will help create a booklet your child can be proud of.

14. Ask your child to read the sentences on each page - continue to give help where necessary. If your child comes to a word he/she cannot read:
• encourage her/him to sound out the word if it can be sounded out –
just say ‘that is a word you can sound out’, and give him/her time to do so.
• if it’s a ‘look-say’ word (one that can’t be sounded out) just tell your child what it is and move on.

NB: Ask your child to point to the words as he/she reads the sentences.
This:
a. reinforces the left to right eye movement.
b. reinforces the fact that sentences and phrases are made up of words.
c. encourages the child to look at each word, so enhancing word recognition. (Otherwise the child is inclined to ‘parrot’ the sentences and is not learning to recognise the words.)



tutor notes for reading book comprhension
Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs' - page 4 of 5

Print the above image and use with the booklet pages of 'Five Funny Bugs'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs'.

Printing Instructions

15. Let your child decide the order the pages will be in his/her booklet.
Discuss with your child if it matters which order she/he decides upon –
of course the title page has to be first. (Why?)
This book tells a story and the pages have to be in order for the story
to make sense.
Let your child discover this.

The page which has the lists of words should be last. (Why?)

16. Staple the pages into a booklet.

17. Ask your child to number the pages.
This is best done in the top right hand corner of each page with a small,
neat number.
This is teaching the child that the pages of a book are (usually) numbered
sequentially.

If your child cannot write the numbers, write them (lightly) for her/him and let her/him trace over your numbers. (Say the number as you write it. Say it again as your child writes it.)

18. Simple Comprehension Exercise:

NB: It is important for your child to understand/comprehend what
he/she is reading.
This is a skill that is developed with practise.
At this stage of reading development it is good to have simple
oral questions to answer:
a) It is encouraging the child to think about what she/he has just
read or perhaps it’s a question that expands your child’s
general knowledge.
b) It is encouraging the child to put his/her thoughts in order to
express an appropriate answer.
Being able to put thoughts into order is an important
pre-requisite for writing.
(I can’t emphasise this enough.)

After reading this story, put it aside and ask your child simple
questions like:

How many funny bugs are there in this story?
Can you remember what they are?
Which one do you think would win a race? Why?
Which one do you think would come last in a race? Why?
Do you think the bugs are good friends? What makes you think so?
Who came looking for something to eat?
Can you remember where the bugs hid when the gull flew near them?
Which bug hid in the hut? the nut? the bud? the mud? the tree?
How do we know it was a fine sunny day?
(Your child may like to draw a sun in the sky on the first page of the story.)

19. Let’s go on a treasure hunt:
A fun way to practise the ‘look-say’ words which appear in this
booklet is to play this game with your child.
You say a word and see how quickly your child can find that word in
the booklet.
To start with, turn to a specific page of the booklet so your child
knows the word will be on that page.
As your child gains confidence and easily recognises the words, you
could use the whole booklet for a challenge.

It is essential to keep the game ‘moving’ and make it enjoyable for the
child – work at his/her level – not too many words at first – find the
same word on a different page - confidence comes with success.

tutor notes for reading book comprhension
Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs' - page 5 of 5

Print the above image and use with the booklet pages of 'Five Funny Bugs'' - and the Tutor Notes for 'Five Funny Bugs'.

Printing Instructions

NB: a ‘look-say’ word is a word that cannot be sounded out e.g. hungry, flew, wooden, rose, out.
Some of the words your child cannot easily sound out now will become words he/she can sound out when he/she learns digraphs (that is two letters together that make a sound eg ou, ch, sh,).

When reading, the child uses the ‘sense of the sentence’ to help him/her read ‘look-say’ words.
Eg. he, she, the, to are look-say words but are usually easily added to the child’s reading vocabulary because they appear so often in a text.

As well as sounding out the three letter words that can be sounded out, encourage her/him to sound out four and five letter words that can be sounded out.eg went, funny, crept, muddy .

A beneficial exercise for your child:
a. Print off a spare booklet.
b. Cut the sentences from each page and put them in random order.
c. Encourage your child to match each sentence to the sentence which is
the same in the booklet he/she has made.
d. Read the sentence.

When your child is competent with this exercise:
a. Take the sentences, one at a time.
b. Cut them into words.
c. Put the words in jumbled order.
d. Encourage your child to rearrange the words into a sentence.
e. Read the sentence.
NB: If your child needs help, let her/him refer to the little booklet.
It’s good when your child can do this without referring to the booklet.
It’s a sign that she/he is actually reading the words.

20. Integrate with:
Mathematics: counting and numbering the pages in the booklet, fitting the drawing of the five funny bugs into the space provided on the last page of the story (spacial awareness), ordinal numbers (first to fifth).

Punctuation: discuss the full stop at the end of each sentence, observe that sentences begin with a capital letter, observe that all names begin with a capital letter.
Observe and discuss the ‘?’ and ‘!’.
Observe and discuss the apostrophe used in
contractions eg can’t, didn’t, I’ve, I’ll, let’s.

Art: drawing the five bugs dancing after the gull had flown away.

Science: Study insects and the life cycle of an insect.
Study snails.

English:Words that rhyme, speech bubbles, contractions
(eg can’t, didn’t etc)

Physical Education: caterpillar walk (humpy – if you have a suitable surface
the children could roll like the caterpillar in the story),
hop like a grasshopper, run like an ant,
move like a snail (let your child use his/her
imagination), fly like a gull looking for bugs to eat –
swoop down to pick up a crumb left over from a picnic,
sway like a tree in the breeze,
‘make yourself into the shape of the big, wooden hut’, ‘make yourself into a beautiful, red rose bud – slowly open out into a beautiful red rose’ (could have both for children to observe), use suitable music and ask children to dance like the bugs after the gull flew away, make up a ‘happy bug dance’.

Enjoy




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